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30 Nov 2015

C28 Vienna Game: 2...Nf6 3.Bc4 Nc6 (1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nge2)

C28 Vienna Game: 2...Nf6 3.Bc4 Nc6 (1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nge2)

This was played on the second round of the over the board tournament that was played at Eura a bit over ten years ago. I came to the second round after winning a game against a player who was rated 2063. On this second round I faced another player who was rated over 2000. This was not at all a success like the first round game, but maybe a demonstration that I clearly was not playing well enough at the time that I could get two wins in a row against 2000+ rated players. Actually I am not that convinced that I could win games regularly against 2000+ players even today, but maybe I could win more than I did back then. Then again this is only a small sample of games from which I can't make too hasty decisions of. Only in the last year or so have I even be able to play quite consistently against players who are rated over 2000+ and even though I do not remember exactly when was the first time I broke that limit, not on over the board chess, but rather while playing in the internet, I do remember what was the place where I did it. It was years ago, probably close to ten years ago at Pogo. It was a brief moment that I was over that limit, but it did show me that I could do that. Nowadays I do not play there, actually I have not played there in several years because other places to play the game have been better. At the moment, I have two ratings on different sites over 2000, though on neither site have I played in months, so those ratings are far from accurate.

[Event "Eura"] [Site "?"] [Date "2005.09.24"] [Round "2"] [White "Lehmusvaara, Esa"] [Black "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C28"] [WhiteElo "2018"] [BlackElo "1783"] [Annotator "Stockfish 6 64 BMI2 (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "59"] [EventDate "2005.09.24"] 1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 {Vienna Game: Stanley Variation, Three Knights Variation} 4. Nge2 {C28 Vienna Game: 2...Nf6 3.Bc4 Nc6} Bc5 5. d3 (5. O-O O-O 6. Ng3 d5 7. Nxd5 Ng4 8. Ne3 Bxe3 9. dxe3 Qh4 10. h3 Nxf2 11. Kxf2 Be6 12. Bd5 g6 13. Qe1 Nb4 14. Qxb4 Bxd5 15. Qe1 Bc4 16. Bd2 f5 17. exf5 Bxf1 18. Kxf1 Rad8 19. Bc3 e4 {Seres,B (2269)-Piroska, I (2195) Hungary 2010 1-0}) 5... Ng4 (5... h6 6. O-O d6 7. Kh1 Ng4 8. d4 Nxd4 9. Nxd4 {0-1 (9) Benavides Villavicencio,R (1485)-Sanchez Villarreal,J (1653) Carpuela 2014}) 6. d4 exd4 {N} (6... Nxd4 7. Nxd4 exd4 8. Qxg4 dxc3 9. Qxg7 Rf8 10. O-O Qh4 11. Bg5 Bd4 12. Qxf8+ Kxf8 13. Bxh4 {1-0 (13) Dimitrov, N-Tiholov, G Sofia 2009}) 7. Na4 {White threatens to win material: Na4xc5} Bb4+ (7... d6 8. O-O O-O 9. h3 {=/+}) 8. c3 {=} dxc3 9. bxc3 (9. Nexc3 $5 Nf6 10. Bf4 {=/+}) 9... Ba5 {+/-} 10. O-O $5 Nge5 {Black threatens to win material: Ne5xc4} 11. Bd5 {Black's piece can't move: c8} O-O 12. f4 Ng6 (12... Ng4 13. e5 d6 14. h3 {+/-}) 13. f5 {= This push gains space} Nge5 {The knight is not easily driven from e5} 14. f6 gxf6 15. Bh6 {White threatens to win material: Bh6xf8} Re8 (15... d6 {=}) 16. Qe1 $4 {Black has a cramped position. Black's piece can't move: c8. with this move White loses his initiative} (16. Nf4 d6 17. Qe1 Kh8 {+/-}) 16... Ne7 $4 {not a good decision, because now the opponent is right back in the game} (16... Kh8 {!? +/-}) 17. Qg3+ (17. Nf4 c6 18. Nh5 cxd5 19. Qf2 {+-}) 17... N5g6 $4 (17... N7g6 18. Nf4 c6 19. Nh5 {+/=}) 18. Bb3 {White has a king attack} (18. Bxf7+ {and White has prevailed} Kxf7 19. Rxf6+ Kg8 20. Nf4 {+-}) 18... d5 {+/- Black threatens to win material: d5xe4} 19. Nf4 {White threatens to win material: Nf4xd5} (19. Rxf6 b5 20. Nc5 {+/=}) 19... c6 $4 {gives the opponent counterplay} (19... b5 { the rescuing straw} 20. Bxd5 c6 (20... Nxd5 21. Nxd5 bxa4 22. Nxf6+ Kh8 23. Rad1 {+/-}) 21. Nxg6 hxg6 22. Bxf7+ Kxf7 23. Rxf6+ Kxf6 24. Rf1+ Bf5 25. exf5 bxa4 26. fxg6+ Ke6 27. Qg4+ Kd6 28. Bf4+ Kc5 29. Be3+ Kd6 30. Bf4+ Kc5 31. Be3+ Kd6 32. Bf4+ {=}) 20. Nh5 {+-} Bc7 $4 {terrible, but what else could Black do to save the game?} (20... b5 21. Nxf6+ Kh8 22. Nxe8 Qxe8 {+-}) 21. Nxf6+ Kh8 22. Qf2 (22. Qxc7 {keeps an even firmer grip} Qxc7 23. Bg7+ Kxg7 24. Nxe8+ Kf8 25. Nxc7 {+-}) 22... Qd6 $4 {the pressure is too much, Black crumbles} (22... Rg8 23. Nxg8 Nxg8 24. Be3 {+-}) 23. g3 (23. Bg7+ $1 {and White takes home the point} Kxg7 24. Nxe8+ Kh6 25. Nxd6 Bxd6 26. exd5 cxd5 27. Qd2+ Kg7 28. Bxd5 {+- }) 23... Rd8 (23... Bh3 24. Nxe8 Rxe8 25. Qxf7 {+-}) 24. Rae1 (24. Nh5 { and White can already relax} f6 25. Bg7+ Kg8 26. exd5 cxd5 27. Bxf6 Bh3 {+-}) 24... b5 (24... Ne5 25. Bg5 b5 26. Nxd5 {+-}) 25. Nh5 f5 26. exd5 cxd5 (26... bxa4 27. Qd4+ Ne5 28. Bg7+ Kg8 29. Bxe5 Bb6 30. Bxd6 Rxd6 31. Rxe7 axb3 32. axb3 Rh6 33. Re8+ Kf7 {+-}) 27. Qd4+ Ne5 28. Rxe5 $1 {Decoy: e5} Kg8 (28... Qxe5 29. Bg7+ {Decoy Double attack}) 29. Re6 (29. Rxd5 Kf7 30. Rxd6+ Be6 31. Qf6+ Kg8 32. Bxe6#) 29... Bb6 (29... Kf7 {cannot undo what has already been done} 30. Rxd6 Bxd6 31. Re1 Rg8 32. Qf6+ Ke8 33. Qxd6 Be6 34. Nf6+ Kf7 35. Qxe6+ Kg6 36. Nxg8+ Kh5 37. Bd1#) 30. Nxb6 $1 {Mate attack} (30. Nxb6 Qc5 31. Qxc5 Ng6 32. Bxd5 Rxd5 33. Rxg6+ Kf7 34. Rf6+ Kg8 35. Rf8#) 1-0

27 Nov 2015

Chess960 SP711

Chess960 SP711

Instead of the normal one game in the new post, there are now two because it made sense to post these two games at the same time. The second site that I visited for the first time three days ago was lichess.org. After I started to play there I noticed at least one thing that I had not seen on any other site before, the starting position for chess960 is shown while you play, which is a great thing because now if I play there I do not need to figure out the starting position on my own after the game. Sure it is not that hard to check the starting position for each game afterwards, but this saves me some time and that is always a good thing. Both of these games are 10 minute games and it really seems to be a good time control for me to use on this variant.

Both lichess.org and ChessRex.com (the sites I played chess960 three days ago) seem to use similar idea for downloading the games you have played there. As far as I can tell, when you download the games, it automatically downloads all your games, which can be great or bad, depending on how you look at it. It is somewhat inefficient if you just want to download your latest game. There might be a way to do that as well, but I am new to both sites, so I do not know all of this stuff just yet. Then again you could just replace the old database with a new one every time. I am not sure what I think about that just yet, but it might be better than some of the options that are given on other sites I have played where you can select which games you download, but there is a limit on how many you can download at a time. I am also not sure why on almost every site the pgn-file that is created from those downloaded games has the chess960 variant in a way that Chessbase does not understand it. Now if there are different ways that different chess programs understand the variant name in the pgn-file, I think that is something that should be a standard, so that no matter what program you used, it would still be able to understand the pgn-file, without the need for the user to modify the file in order for it to work. Also my problem that I told about in the post yesterday has been fixed, it seemed that I needed a bit of fixing, I caused the problem on myself. I talked about my problem to the programmer of the site and after that little chat I realised what I had done wrong. I have added one analysed game to the following posts: D00 Queen Pawn Game: General, A06 Zukertort Opening: Old Indian Attack, A20 English Opening: King's English Variation. General and A30 English Opening: Symmetrical Variation. General. I have also added two mate in three, one mate in four and two mate in six puzzles today.

Game number two. This was a rematch that my opponent challenged me into. It was actually a good thing that the rematch used the same starting position, it gives both players the opportunity to play on both sides of that starting position. Some starting positions might seem to favor one side more than the other, or so I have thought occasionally when I have played chess960.

26 Nov 2015

Chess960 SP878

Chess960 SP878

Sometimes it is fun to test chess/chess960 sites that I have not been playing before and two days ago I did just that. First I went to see what this e-chess960.com site was all about after I had seen a blog post that said it was a good place to play chess960. After I had created an account there, I asked some silly questions in chat because I was new to the site and did not know how things are done at that site. People were helpful and I got answers I was looking for, so it was time to play a game there. I have finished one game there and it is the game you can see below. This was a 10 minute game without increment and I think the quality of the game is better than it was on those previous chess960 games that I have posted recently from the Chess960 pool. After this game I offered my opponent a rematch, but we did not start a new 10 minute game, but instead a correspondence game with a 5 day timeout. Chances are that I can't finish that new game, because I can't log into that site anymore for some reason. I contacted the admin of the site today and time will tell what happens. If for some reason there is no solution to my problem, the game I share now is the last one I have played there. I do not really believe it would end up being like that and I think some solution will be reached and I can log in there some time in the hopefuly near future to continue that game I started and also play other games and get to know the site better. I did end up also testing another site the same day, but more about in the post I will do tomorrow. I have added one mate in one, one mate in two and three mate in four puzzles today. In addition, I have added one analysed game to the following posts: C62 Spanish Game: Steinitz Defense, C64 Spanish Game: Classical Variation, A20 English Opening: King's English Variation. General and A30 English Opening: Symmetrical Variation. General.

Game number two. The game below was played at lichess.org on December 25th 2015. This was a 7 minute game with a 4 second increment. I was rated 1775 before this game and marriedbachelor was rated 1557. The game started in a decent fashion where I got the hold of the center and it was hard for my opponent to develop his dark squared bishop. Actually on move six he decides to sacrifice a pawn in order to get his bishop activated. I am happy to get that material even if I have to give up the bishop pair in order to do so. My opponent blunders a pawn when he decides to play 13...Ne4? and after I take twice on e4, I am up a second pawn. The rest of the game does not pose that many difficulties for me and marriedbachelor resigns after I took his queen on move 26.

Game number three. For this game, I will for now post only a video of me doing a live commentary of the game. I will analyse this game at some point in a similar way as I have with the two other games found in this post, but unfortunately it might take quite a long time.

25 Nov 2015

D35 Queen's Gambit Declined: Exchange Variation (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.e3 O-O 6.Bxf6 Bxf6 7.Bd3 b6 8.cxd5 exd5)

D35 Queen's Gambit Declined: Exchange Variation (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.e3 O-O 6.Bxf6 Bxf6 7.Bd3 b6 8.cxd5 exd5)

This game is from the fifth round of the tournament that was held at Hanko between June 17th and June 19th in 2005. Before this final round game I had gathered two wins and two draws. So I had played quite well, considering that the draws were played against higher rated players. The win in the game below meant that my final score was 4 out of 5! I think this was the first time that I was able to play these weekend tournaments without a loss. This also marks the record breaking rating increase in one over the board tournament for me because I was able to increase my rating by 101 points! I have not been able to break this record so far and it is very unlikely that I will ever be able to do that. I think I have been able to increase my rating by 100 points once after this tournament, but I have been able to decrease it in a similar fashion as well. That very bad tournament lasted nine rounds though.

Another very busy day for me and it does not even after this post. Luckily similar days I face only once a month, because the club tournament I participate in, is played on a last Wednesday of the month. I think that tournament will end in May, so I need to face these type of days for quite awhile still.

[Event "Hangon turnaus"] [Site "?"] [Date "2005.06.19"] [Round "5"] [White "Pesonen, Pekka"] [Black "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D35"] [WhiteElo "1724"] [BlackElo "1678"] [Annotator "Stockfish 6 64 BMI2 (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "94"] [EventDate "2005.06.19"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e3 O-O {Queen's Gambit Declined: 4. Bg5 Be7, 5.e3 O-O} 6. Bxf6 (6. Nf3 b6 (6... h6 7. Bh4 b6 8. cxd5 exd5 {Queen's Gambit Declined: Tartakower Variation, Exchange Variation} (8... Nxd5 9. Bxe7 Qxe7 10. Nxd5 exd5 11. Rc1 Be6 {Queen's Gambit Declined: Tartakower Variation}) ) 7. Bd3 Bb7 8. cxd5 exd5 9. Ne5 {Queen's Gambit Declined: Pillsbury Attack}) 6... Bxf6 7. Bd3 b6 8. cxd5 exd5 {D35 Queen's Gambit Declined: Exchange Variation} 9. Qc2 (9. Qh5 Re8 10. Nf3 c6 11. Qxh7+ Kf8 12. O-O Bg4 13. Ne5 Be6 14. f4 Ke7 15. Qh5 Rh8 16. Qf3 Qd6 17. Rad1 Nd7 18. e4 Bxe5 19. fxe5 Qb4 20. Bb1 dxe4 21. Bxe4 Rac8 22. Rf2 Rh4 23. Qe3 Kf8 {Uhlmann, W (2500)-Brueggemann, J (2305) Germany 1991 1-0}) 9... g6 10. Nf3 Bb7 11. O-O {N} (11. h4 h5 12. O-O-O Kg7 13. g4 hxg4 14. Ne5 Bxe5 15. dxe5 Nd7 16. e6 Ne5 17. exf7 Nxd3+ 18. Rxd3 Rxf7 19. h5 Qf6 20. hxg6 Qxg6 21. Nxd5 Bxd5 22. Qc3+ Qf6 23. Qxf6+ Rxf6 24. Rxd5 Rxf2 25. Rg5+ Kf6 {Rummelshaus,H (1927)-Rempe,M (1648) Moehnesee 2010 1/2-1/2 (79)}) 11... Nd7 12. e4 dxe4 {Black forks: d3+f3} 13. Nxe4 {White has an active position.} (13. Bxe4 c6 {=}) 13... Bg7 14. b4 Nf6 15. Nxf6+ Bxf6 { Attacking the isolated pawn on d4} 16. Be4 Bxe4 17. Qxe4 Qd6 (17... c5 18. bxc5 bxc5 19. Rad1 {=/+}) 18. a3 Rfe8 {Black threatens to win material: Re8xe4} 19. Qd3 (19. Qc2 {!? =/+ should not be overlooked}) 19... c5 {+/-} 20. bxc5 bxc5 21. Rad1 cxd4 22. Rfe1 (22. Rc1 Rac8 {+/-}) 22... Rxe1+ 23. Rxe1 Qc5 24. g3 a5 25. Rd1 Rd8 26. Nd2 Be7 27. Nb1 (27. a4 {-+}) 27... a4 28. Kg2 Qb6 (28... Rb8 29. Qe4 {-+}) 29. Qe4 Bc5 30. Qd3 Rb8 31. Nd2 Qa5 (31... Qc6+ 32. Qe4 Qa6 33. Nf3 {-+}) 32. Rb1 (32. Ne4 Qa8 33. f3 Qa5 {+/-}) 32... Rd8 (32... Rxb1 $5 33. Nxb1 Qb6 34. Nd2 Qb7+ 35. Kg1 {-+}) 33. Ne4 {+/-} Qa8 34. Kg1 (34. f3 Be7 {-+}) 34... Bxa3 $1 {Deflection: e4} 35. Nf6+ (35. Qxa3 Qxe4 {Overloading Deflection} ) 35... Kg7 36. Rb6 $4 {the final mistake, not that it matters anymore} (36. Qxa3 Kxf6 37. Rb4 {+/-}) 36... Be7 {-+} 37. Ra6 Qc8 (37... Bxf6 $6 {is no comparison} 38. Rxa8 Rxa8 39. Qa3 {-+}) 38. Ne4 a3 39. h4 Qc1+ (39... Qb7 $5 { keeps an even firmer grip} 40. Ra4 {-+}) 40. Kg2 Rd7 41. Qb5 (41. h5 {is not the saving move} Qb2 42. g4 Qb7 {-+}) 41... Qc7 42. Rc6 (42. Rb6 {does not save the day} d3 43. Nd2 Rd4 {-+}) 42... Qb7 43. Qe5+ (43. Qxb7 {does not win a prize} Rxb7 44. Ra6 Rb2 {-+}) 43... Kg8 44. Rc1 d3 (44... f5 {and Black can already relax} 45. Qe6+ Kf8 46. Kg1 fxe4 47. Qe5 {-+}) 45. Kh3 (45. Kh2 { is one last hope} a2 46. Ra1 {-+}) 45... d2 46. Rd1 Qd5 (46... a2 47. h5 Rd5 { -+}) 47. Qxe7 (47. Qxd5 {is the last straw} Rxd5 48. f4 {-+}) 47... Qf5+ (47... Qf5+ 48. g4 Qf3+ 49. Ng3 Rxe7 50. Rxd2 Rb7 51. Re2 Rb2 52. Re3 Qxf2 53. Re8+ Kg7 54. Re2 Rxe2 55. Nxe2 Qxe2 56. g5 Qe3+ 57. Kg2 a2 58. h5 a1=Q 59. h6+ Kf8 60. Kh2 Qag1#) (47... Rxe7 $6 {is a weaker possibility} 48. Nf6+ Kg7 49. Nxd5 { =}) 0-1

24 Nov 2015

B00 Queen's Fianchetto Defence, Nimzowitsch Defence (1.d4 b6 2.e4 Bb7 3.Nc3 e6 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bg5 Be7 6.Bd3 d5)

B00 Queen's Fianchetto Defence, Nimzowitsch Defence (1.d4 b6 2.e4 Bb7 3.Nc3 e6 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bg5 Be7 6.Bd3 d5)

After four consecutive posting days of new and different chess960 starting positions, it is time once again to introduce new opening variation, as far as this blog is concerned that is. The game below was played on the first round of the tournament called Maximum ! which is named so because of the thinking times used in the tournament. The longest possible thinking times you can get at Chess.com is 14 days for each move and this tournament has that time control. I still have one game in progress on this first round that started on September 11th 2014. No matter what happens on that last game, I will not be able to advance to the second round, but instead I am eliminated from the rest of the tournament. If I looked the tie-break numbers correctly, I will be fifth in the final standings of group #4 if I win my last game. I am currently on seventh place with 12.5 points. My game is the last one still in progress in this group, but there are still seven other games in progress luckily, so that people are not just waiting for my game to end, but other games as well. The top three that will advance to the next round are players called chramer (21.5 points), astra81 (18 points) and thematrosken (14 points). Had AndreasChess won this game, he would have been third in the final standings and advanced to the next round. Probably draw would have also sufficed for him, because then he would have tied thematrosken on points.

[Event "Maximum ! - Round 1"] [Site "Chess.com"] [Date "2014.09.11"] [Round "?"] [White "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Black "AndreasChess"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B00"] [WhiteElo "1873"] [BlackElo "1930"] [Annotator "Stockfish 6 64 BMI2 (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "149"] [EventDate "2014.??.??"] 1. d4 b6 {English Defense (#2)} 2. e4 (2. c4 Bb7 3. Nc3 e5 {English Defense: Eastbourne Gambit}) 2... Bb7 3. Nc3 (3. Bd3 f5 4. exf5 Bxg2 5. Qh5+ g6 { Owen Defense: Matovinsky Gambit}) (3. Bg5 {Owen Defense: Naselwaus Gambit}) 3... e6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bg5 Be7 6. Bd3 d5 {B00 Queen's Fianchetto Defence, Nimzowitsch Defence} (6... h6 7. Bd2 c5 8. dxc5 Bxc5 9. Qe2 d5 10. exd5 Nxd5 11. O-O-O Nd7 12. g4 Qc7 13. Nxd5 Bxd5 14. c4 Bb7 15. Be4 O-O-O 16. Bxb7+ Kxb7 17. Kb1 Rhe8 18. Bc3 f6 19. Nd4 Bxd4 20. Bxd4 e5 21. Be3 {Matthiesen,M (2300) -Kragh,N Copenhagen 2000 1/2-1/2 (37)}) 7. e5 (7. Bxf6 Bxf6 8. e5 Be7 9. Qd2 O-O 10. O-O-O c5 11. Nb5 Bc6 12. h4 h6 13. g4 c4 14. Be2 Bxb5 15. c3 a5 16. g5 h5 17. Nh2 g6 18. Rdg1 Kg7 19. Nf1 a4 20. a3 Rh8 21. Rh3 Nc6 {Volpati,A (1609) -Gorini,M (1394) Crema 2013 0-1 (46)}) 7... Ne4 8. Bxe7 Qxe7 9. O-O {N} (9. Bxe4 dxe4 10. Nd2 c5 (10... e3 11. Nf3 exf2+ 12. Kxf2 Nc6 13. Qd3 Rd8 14. a3 O-O 15. Ne2 Nxd4 16. Nexd4 c5 17. c3 cxd4 18. cxd4 Rd7 19. Rac1 Rfd8 20. Rhd1 f6 21. Qe3 fxe5 22. Nxe5 Qh4+ 23. Kg1 Rxd4 24. Rxd4 Qxd4 25. Qxd4 {Hava, P-Provaznik,J Klatovy 2001 1-0 (40)}) 11. Ndxe4 cxd4 12. Qxd4 O-O 13. O-O Rd8 14. Nd6 Nc6 15. Qf4 Ba6 16. Rfe1 Nxe5 17. Qxe5 Rxd6 18. Qe4 Bb7 19. Qa4 Bc6 20. Qa3 Rad8 21. Qb4 Qb7 22. g3 Bh1 23. f3 Qxf3 {Huistra,H-Perluka,P Hengelo 1997 0-1 (34)}) 9... O-O 10. Bxe4 (10. Ne2 c5 {=}) 10... dxe4 {=/+} 11. Nd2 e3 ( 11... Rd8 $5 {should be investigated more closely} 12. Ncxe4 Nc6 {=/+}) 12. fxe3 {+/=} Qg5 {Black has a mate threat} 13. Qe2 Qg6 (13... Ba6 14. Nc4 Bxc4 15. Qxc4 Qxe3+ 16. Kh1 {+/=}) 14. Rfc1 Nd7 15. Nf3 f6 16. exf6 Rxf6 17. e4 Raf8 18. Rf1 c5 19. d5 exd5 20. Nxd5 {Menacing.} Re6 {Black threatens to win material: Re6xe4} 21. Qb5 {White threatens to win material: Qb5xd7} (21. Nc3 {= }) 21... Bc6 $4 {not a good decision, because now the opponent is right back in the game} (21... Qxe4 {and Black hangs on} 22. Qxd7 Qxd5 {=/+} (22... Bxd5 $2 23. Rae1 Qf5 24. Ne5 Qxf1+ 25. Rxf1 Rxf1+ 26. Kxf1 Rxe5 27. Kf2 {+-})) 22. Qb3 $4 {there were better ways to keep up the pressure} (22. Qxc6 $1 {and the result of the game is clear: White will win} Rxc6 23. Ne7+ Kh8 24. Nxg6+ hxg6 25. Rad1 {+-}) 22... Kh8 (22... Rxe4 {must be avoided because of the following mating combination} 23. Ne7+ Kh8 24. Nxg6+ hxg6 25. Ng5 Rf6 26. Rad1 Re5 27. Qh3+ Kg8 28. Qh7+ Kf8 29. Qh8+ Ke7 30. Qxg7+ Kd8 31. Qxf6+ Kc7 32. Ne6+ Rxe6 33. Qxe6 b5 34. Rxd7+ Kb6 35. Rf6 c4 36. Qxc6+ Ka5 37. Rxa7+ Kb4 38. a3#) 23. Nd2 Rxf1+ 24. Rxf1 Qg5 25. Qd3 Rd6 $2 (25... h6 26. Rf5 Qh4 27. c4 {+/-}) 26. c4 (26. Nf3 $5 Qd8 27. c4 {+-}) 26... Rg6 {+/-} 27. Rf2 h5 (27... h6 {!? +/-}) 28. Qf3 Kh7 (28... h4 29. Qh3 Bxd5 30. exd5 {+-} (30. cxd5 Rf6 31. Re2 Ne5 {+/- }) (30. Qxd7 $6 Bxc4 31. e5 Kh7 {=})) 29. Qf5 (29. Qe2 {might be the shorter path} Qh6 30. Nf3 h4 {+-}) 29... Nf6 $2 (29... Qxf5 30. Rxf5 (30. exf5 Rg4 {+/- }) 30... Kh6 31. Kf2 {+-}) 30. Nxf6+ (30. Ne7 $5 {and White can already relax} Qxf5 31. exf5 Rh6 32. Nxc6 Ng4 {+-}) 30... gxf6 31. Qxg5 $4 {weakening the position} (31. Qc8 {would have made live much easier for White} Ba4 32. b3 {+-} ) 31... fxg5 {+/-} 32. Rf7+ {White forks: a7} Kh6 (32... Rg7 $5 33. Rxg7+ Kxg7 {+/-}) 33. Kf2 (33. Rxa7 $6 Rd6 34. Rc7 Ba8 {+/=}) 33... a5 (33... Rg7 34. Rf8 {+/-}) 34. Ke3 (34. Re7 Rg8 {+-}) 34... g4 (34... Re6 35. Rf8 {+/-}) 35. g3 Re6 36. Rf8 Kg5 37. Rb8 Be8 38. Rd8 a4 39. Rd5+ Kg6 40. Kf4 Kf6 $2 (40... Rf6+ 41. Rf5 Rd6 42. Rg5+ Kh6 43. Rd5 Rf6+ 44. Ke3 {+/-}) 41. Rf5+ (41. e5+ {keeps an even firmer grip} Ke7 {+-}) 41... Ke7 $2 (41... Kg7 {+/-}) 42. e5 Bg6 43. Rg5 Kf7 44. Ne4 Kg7 45. Nf6 Kh6 (45... a3 {doesn't get the cat off the tree} 46. bxa3 Kf7 {+-}) 46. Ng8+ (46. a3 {and White has triumphed} Bf7 47. Ng8+ Kh7 48. Kf5 {+-}) 46... Kg7 $4 {Black threatens to win material: Kg7xg8. with this move Black loses his initiative} (46... Kh7 47. Nf6+ Kh6 48. a3 {+-}) 47. Nf6 { Twofold repetition} Kh6 48. Nd5 (48. a3 $5 {makes it even easier for White} Bf7 49. Ng8+ Kh7 {+-}) 48... Bb1 $4 {further deteriorates the position} (48... Re8 49. Ne3 Rd8 50. Nf5+ Bxf5 51. Rxf5 Rd4+ 52. Ke3 {+/-}) 49. Nc3 (49. Rg8 $5 { makes it even easier for White} Bd3 50. Ne3 Re7 {+-}) 49... Bd3 $2 (49... Bg6 50. Nb5 Re8 {+/-}) 50. Nxa4 $4 {forfeits the clear win} (50. Rg8 Re7 51. Rf8 Bxc4 52. Rf6+ Kg7 53. Nxa4 Bxa2 54. Rxb6 Rf7+ 55. Kg5 Re7 {+-}) 50... Bxc4 $4 { forfeits the advantage} (50... Re8 51. Rf5 Bxf5 52. Kxf5 Rf8+ 53. Ke4 Rf2 54. Nxb6 Rxb2 {-+}) 51. a3 {+-} Rc6 $2 (51... Bd3 52. Rg8 Re7 {+-}) 52. Rf5 b5 53. Nc3 b4 (53... Kg7 {there is nothing better in the position} 54. Ne4 Bd5 55. Rxh5 b4 56. Rg5+ Kf8 57. Rxg4 bxa3 58. bxa3 Rc7 {+-}) 54. axb4 cxb4 55. Ne4 Rg6 (55... Kg6 56. Rf6+ Rxf6+ 57. Nxf6 {+-}) 56. Rf6 (56. Nf6 Bf1 57. Rxh5+ Kg7 58. Kf5 Bd3+ 59. Ke6 Bc4+ 60. Ke7 Rh6 61. Rxh6 Kxh6 62. Nxg4+ Kg7 63. Ne3 Ba2 64. h4 Bb3 65. e6 Kg6 66. Kd6 Ba4 67. g4 b3 68. Nd5 Bb5 69. Nc7 Ba4 70. e7 Kf7 71. g5 Kg6 72. e8=Q+ Bxe8 73. Nxe8 Kf5 74. Nf6 Kg6 75. Ke6 Kg7 76. h5 Kh8 77. Ke7 Kg7 78. Ne8+ Kh7 79. Kf7 Kh8 80. Kf8 Kh7 81. Nd6 Kh8 82. Nf7+ Kh7 83. g6#) 56... Bd5 (56... Be6 {hoping against hope} 57. Rf8 Rg7 {+-}) 57. Rxg6+ (57. Kf5 Rxf6+ 58. Nxf6 Bc6 59. e6 Kg7 60. Nxh5+ Kf8 61. Kf6 Ke8 62. Ng7+ Kd8 63. e7+ Kc7 64. Ke5 Bd7 65. e8=Q Bxe8 66. Nxe8+ Kb6 67. b3 Kc5 68. Nf6 Kc6 69. Nxg4 Kd7 70. Nh6 Ke8 71. g4 Kf8 72. Ke6 Ke8 73. g5 Kf8 74. h4 Ke8 75. g6 Kf8 76. h5 Ke8 77. Nf7 Kf8 78. h6 Kg8 79. h7+ Kg7 80. h8=Q+ Kxg6 81. Qh6#) 57... Kxg6 {+-} 58. Nc5 b3 (58... Ba8 59. Nd3 b3 {+-}) 59. Nd7 Be6 60. Nf8+ Kf7 61. Nxe6 Kxe6 62. Kg5 (62. Ke4 Ke7 63. Kf5 Kf7 64. Kg5 Ke6 65. Kxh5 Kxe5 66. Kxg4 Kd4 67. h4 Kd3 68. h5 Kc2 69. h6 Kxb2 70. h7 Kc2 71. h8=Q b2 72. Qh7+ Kc1 73. Qh1+ Kc2 74. Qe4+ Kc1 75. Qc4+ Kd2 76. Qb3 Kc1 77. Qc3+ Kb1 78. Kf3 Ka2 79. Qc4+ Ka3 80. Qb5 b1=Q 81. Qxb1 Ka4 82. Ke4 Ka3 83. Kd5 Ka4 84. Kc4 Ka3 85. Qa1#) 62... Kxe5 63. Kxh5 Kf5 64. Kh4 Ke4 65. Kxg4 Kd3 66. h4 Kc2 67. h5 Kxb2 68. h6 Kc1 (68... Ka2 {hardly improves anything} 69. h7 b2 70. h8=Q b1=Q 71. Qa8+ Kb2 72. Qb7+ Ka1 73. Qxb1+ Kxb1 74. Kf5 Ka1 75. g4 Kb1 76. g5 Ka1 77. g6 Kb1 78. g7 Kc2 79. Ke4 Kd2 80. Kd4 Ke2 81. g8=Q Kf3 82. Qg5 Kf2 83. Qg4 Ke1 84. Qg2 Kd1 85. Kd3 Kc1 86. Qc2#) 69. h7 b2 70. h8=Q b1=Q 71. Qh1+ Kc2 (71... Kb2 {cannot change destiny} 72. Qxb1+ Kxb1 73. Kf5 Ka1 74. g4 Kb2 75. Kf4 Ka1 76. g5 Kb1 77. g6 Kc2 78. Ke3 Kb3 79. g7 Kc4 80. g8=Q+ Kb5 81. Qd8 Kc6 82. Kd4 Kb5 83. Qd7+ Kb4 84. Qb7+ Ka3 85. Kc3 Ka2 86. Qb2#) 72. Qxb1+ Kxb1 73. Kf5 Kc2 (73... Ka1 { does not save the day} 74. g4 Ka2 75. g5 Kb2 76. g6 Kc2 77. Ke4 Kb3 78. g7 Kc4 79. g8=Q+ Kc3 80. Ke3 Kc2 81. Kd4 Kb2 82. Kd3 Ka1 83. Kc3 Kb1 84. Qb3+ Ka1 85. Qb2#) 74. g4 Kd3 (74... Kc1 {does not improve anything} 75. g5 Kb2 76. g6 Kc2 77. g7 Kd3 78. g8=Q Kd4 79. Qb3 Kc5 80. Ke5 Kc6 81. Qc4+ Kd7 82. Qc3 Ke8 83. Qc7 Kf8 84. Kf6 Kg8 85. Qg7#) 75. g5 (75. g5 Kc2 76. g6 Kb1 77. Ke4 Kc2 78. g7 Kd2 79. g8=Q Kc3 80. Qd5 Kc2 81. Qb5 Kc3 82. Ke3 Kc2 83. Qb4 Kc1 84. Kd3 Kd1 85. Qb1#) 1-0

23 Nov 2015

Chess960 SP202

Chess960 SP202

This is my third game from the Chess960 pool and this time I concentrated on the game and did not try to do any commentary while I played. It had one positive effect, I did not lose on time, yay. Not sure if my game improved all that much though and I was on losing position when my opponent ran out of time. I think I will try a couple of other places to play chess960 for the next posts about chess960 that I will make. The goal is to play longer games than I get easily at the Internet Chess Club and faster ones that I can play at Chess.com because there I can easily play chess960 only as a correspondence game. Maybe it will change in the future, but if it means that they have to adapt the look of the new version of the site, I might just stop playing there altogether. Well, I may be a bit too harh on it, but I prefer the older version. It might be because I am accustomed to the old version and it would take some time to adapt to the new version.

I was never on the better side in this game, well maybe at one point I could have gotten some advantage, but I was unable to play accurately, partly due to time trouble and partly because I had no clear plan on how to proceed. After the missed opportunity for some kind of advantage an evenish position continued until I blundered in time trouble and played 38.Qd4? which lost the b5 pawn and should have also lost the game if my opponent had more time. I have added one analysed game to the following posts today: B18 Caro-Kann Defense: Classical Variation, C69 Spanish Game: Exchange Variation. Gligoric Variation, B12 Caro-Kann Defense: Advance Variation and E16 Queen's Indian Defense: Capablanca Variation. I have also added one mate in two, two mate in four and two mate in five puzzles today. There will be more chess960 later this week, but not every day.

20 Nov 2015

Chess960 SP209

Chess960 SP209

This is now a second game of chess960 in a row that I have played at the Chess960 pool at the Internet Chess Club. I did try some live commentary on both in the game I shared yesterday and in the game I am sharing with you now. I am not used to do that so it is enough of a distraction that I can't really play with the time controls they use in this pool. Both of these games are not that good from my point of view, but at least I got more experience in chess960 and maybe next time I will play better. I should get all the chess960 starting positions featured in this blog sooner or later and if the amount of chess960 games increases enough, I may want to do distinctions between the games in more detail. This would mean that I would name rename the posts like Chess960 SP209 with 1.e4, for instance, or something in that manner, depending on how I want to do that when the time comes.

Next week I might post more chess960 games again, but I will definetely post some if not all of my recent correspondence games. Those have been ending in a decent pace again and most of the games that were continuing despite the fact that there was not a shadow of a doubt about the winner have ended finally. There might be one or two games still that should be clear as well but they have not yet ended. I have currently 62 games in progress, most of them are chess games, but there are also some chess960 games. I have added one mate in one, one mate in three, one mate in four, one mate in five and one mate in six puzzle. I have also added one analysed game to the following posts: C64 Spanish Game: Classical Variation, A15 English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. Mikenas-Carls Variation, D55 Queen's Gambit Declined: Modern Variation. Normal Line and A20 English Opening: King's English Variation. General. Until Monday, my fellow chess enthusiasts!

19 Nov 2015

Chess960 SP554

Chess960 SP554

Two days ago I intended to play a couple of games of chess960 at ICC again with ten minute time controls. I tried to get a game on couple of occasions, but no one was interested to accept my challenge, so I looked for other possibilities to play chess960 games on one sitting. I went to Chess.com and tried to see if I can get a game there, the problem there is that on the older version of the site it can't be done and on the newer version which I do not personally like all that much, I could not get a game either even if the possibility for it is there, so I had to search for other possible sites to play chess960 at. While I was searching, I came across a help site for the Internet Chess Club which mentioned that there is a special pool for chess960. So I headed back to ICC to try it out. I did get a game quite quickly, but the problem with the pool is in my opinion that it uses the 3 1 time control, which means the base time is 3 minutes and increment is one second. These are a bit too fast time controls for me. It was especially difficult because I tried once more to do a live commentary while I played, which made me lose both of the games I played on Tuesday. I played in that pool again yesterday and this time without the live commentary, so I was more concentrated on the game and I even won that game on time. I still would prefer to play with longer time controls and if there was another pool for chess960 at ICC with longer time controls, I would like to play in that one instead of this one.

In other news, I finally won my first tournament at Red Hot Pawn. It took maybe longer than would have been necessary because my opponent in the last game dragged the game out a bit too long in my opinion because the result was clear for a long time before he or she resigned. I mean had it been me, I would have resigned several moves and weeks ago. Then again, it is not against the rules of chess or anything like that to play to the bitter end. This was my second win in a correspondence chess tournament, the first one I was able to get some years ago at the Queen Alice Internet Chess Club where I am still at my peak rating of 2203, because I have not played there in weeks. I should activate myself there again, but it might take me quite some time to do that. I have added two mate in two, two mate in three and one mate in five puzzle today. I have also added one analysed game to the following posts: A15 English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. Mikenas-Carls Variation, C53 Italian Game: Classical Variation. Giuoco Pianissimo, A30 English Opening: Symmetrical Variation. General and D02 Queen Pawn Game: Zukertort Variation.

18 Nov 2015

Chess960 SP262

Chess960 SP262

Time for some chess960 once again and this I played at the Internet Chess Club as a 10 minute rated game. Ten minutes is probably the lowest amount of time I can play chess960 somewhat ok. I do make quite bad moves even with these time controls, but somehow I can get back in the game after some moves are played. I mainly struggle in the opening phase of the game as I have no exact plan of how to play a certain starting position. Or I should say that I always think that I have a decent way to play in my mind, but after a couple of moves I see the error of my thought process. I still consider myself a newbie in chess960, because I have only played 47 games of it. Some starting positions I do get more familiar with because the starting positions do not change in the tournaments that are held at Chess.com. I do not think though that I would be any kind of expert in those starting positions either, but at least I have some experience in them.

After I had played two moves in this game and I saw my opponent play 3.f4 with the idea of attacking both the e5 and a7 pawns, I thought that here I go again with an unintentional pawn sacrifice in the opening. It did not end up being such a bad thing in the end especially when my opponent did not take that pawn immediately and actually the analysis after this game showed that Stockfish even prefers my position after Squaring took that pawn. I did end up ruining my position later in the game and I was only able to win this game because my opponent ran out of time. I have added one analysed game to my post D10 Slav Defense: General. In addition, I have added one mate in two, one mate in three, one mate in four and two mate in five puzzles.

Game number two. This game was played at ChessRex.com as a correspondence game with both players having 5 days to make their move. This ended up lasting only a bit over a month, which is quite fast paced for me as far as correspondence games are concerned. The game started on November 24th and finished on December 27th. November 24th was also the first day that I visited ChessRex.com and started to play there. Since that day, I have finished 5 games there, one 10 minute chess960 game and four correspondence games out of which three have been chess games and one has been a chess960 game. I have so far won all my games there, but I doubt it will last for long. I am currently playing four games there and have kept my game load at four steadily there recently.

Game number three will be seen only as a video for now. More detailed look at it will be seen here at some point in time.

17 Nov 2015

A95 Classical Dutch: Classical Stonewall: 7.Nc3 c6 (1.d4 f5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 e6 4.Nf3 Be7 5.g3 O-O 6.Bg2 c6 7.O-O d5 8.Bf4)

A95 Classical Dutch: Classical Stonewall: 7.Nc3 c6 (1.d4 f5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 e6 4.Nf3 Be7 5.g3 O-O 6.Bg2 c6 7.O-O d5 8.Bf4)

The game I am sharing with you now was played in a team match called TM C.L. 2016 Div. C RO: Kopaonik vs. 300 Spartans. The match is being played on 109 boards and I am playing on board 22 for Kopaonik in this match. The current score in the match is 98 - 70 in our favor and things are looking good for us, but the match is still not been decided and we still need to get at least 11.5 points to secure the win. In the game below I found myself in a position I am not usually in, I was conducting a direct attack against the enemy king. This is because I am rarely given the opportunity to do so and also because it would more often than not involve sacrifising some material, which I do not do lightly. I do not like to give any material if I can help it, so sacrificial attacks are not my style, I would like to try that out someday though. The only times I have consciously sacrifised material are times when I see a clear benefit in doing so. Of course sometimes I miscalculate or just play the correct moves, but in wrong order which makes me lose games. I did not even need to sacrifice any material as my opponent pretty much self-destructed in the game below.

[Event "TM C.L. 2016 Div. C RO: Kopaonik vs. 300"] [Site "Chess.com"] [Date "2015.09.30"] [Round "?"] [White "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Black "savatage27"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A95"] [WhiteElo "1878"] [BlackElo "1783"] [Annotator "Stockfish 6 64 BMI2 (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "41"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] 1. d4 f5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 e6 4. Nf3 Be7 5. g3 O-O 6. Bg2 c6 7. O-O d5 {Dutch Defense: Classical Variation, Stonewall Variation} 8. Bf4 {A95 Classical Dutch: Classical Stonewall: 7.Nc3 c6} (8. Qc2 Qe8 9. Bg5 {Dutch Defense: Stonewall: Chekhover Variation}) 8... Nh5 9. Bc1 {N} (9. e3 Nd7 10. Re1 (10. cxd5 exd5 11. Rb1 Nhf6 12. b4 Ne4 13. Qc2 g5 14. Be5 g4 15. Nd2 Nxe5 16. dxe5 a6 17. f3 gxf3 18. Nxf3 Qe8 19. Ne2 Bg5 20. Nf4 Bh6 21. a4 Bd7 22. Rfd1 Bg7 23. Qb2 Nd6 24. Rbc1 b5 {Shirov,A (2655) -Agdestein,S (2590) Gausdal 1992 1-0 (61)}) 10... b6 11. Ne5 Nxe5 12. Bxe5 Nf6 13. Qc2 Bb7 14. cxd5 cxd5 15. Rac1 Qd7 16. Qb3 Ba6 17. Bxf6 Bxf6 18. Nxd5 exd5 19. Qxd5+ Qxd5 20. Bxd5+ Kh8 21. Bxa8 Rxa8 22. Rc7 Bd8 23. Rf7 g6 {Nguyen,H (1974)-Kulkarni,B (2208) Hue 2012 1/2-1/2 (35)}) (9. cxd5 Nxf4 10. gxf4 exd5 11. Ne5 Nd7 12. e3 Bd6 13. Qb3 Kh8 14. Rac1 Nf6 15. f3 Qe7 16. Na4 Be6 17. Nc5 Bxc5 18. Rxc5 Rab8 19. Qa3 Nd7 20. Ra5 Qxa3 21. Rxa3 a6 22. Nd3 Nb6 23. Nc5 Rfe8 {Szusterowski,R (2042)-Grochulski,G (2045) Chelm 2010 1-0 (63)}) (9. Be5 Nd7 10. Qc2 Bf6 11. Rad1 Qe7 12. Qb3 Kh8 13. a3 b6 14. Qb4 c5 15. Bxf6 Nhxf6 16. dxc5 a5 17. Qb3 dxc4 18. Qxc4 Ba6 19. Qh4 bxc5 20. Rfe1 Rab8 21. e4 fxe4 22. Nxe4 Rfd8 23. Nfg5 Ne5 {Chabanon,J (2455)-Housieaux,D (2431) France 2010 1/2-1/2 (43)}) 9... dxc4 (9... Nf6 {!? = must be considered} ) 10. Ne5 {White threatens to win material: Ne5xc4} Nf6 11. Nxc4 Nd5 12. e4 Nxc3 (12... Nb6 13. Nxb6 axb6 14. exf5 Rxf5 15. Bf4 {+/-}) 13. bxc3 c5 (13... fxe4 14. Bxe4 Nd7 15. Re1 {+/-}) 14. d5 fxe4 15. Bxe4 exd5 16. Bxd5+ Kh8 17. Ne5 Qb6 $2 (17... Nc6 18. Nf7+ Rxf7 19. Bxf7 Qxd1 20. Rxd1 {+-}) 18. Be3 (18. Nf7+ {seems even better} Rxf7 19. Bxf7 Qf6 {+-}) 18... Be6 $4 {the position was bad, and this mistake simply hastens the end} (18... Qf6 19. Qh5 g6 {+/-}) 19. Be4 (19. Rb1 {makes it even easier for White} Qd6 20. Bxb7 Qxe5 21. Bxa8 { +-}) 19... Bf6 (19... Bf5 20. Bxf5 Rxf5 {+-}) 20. Qh5 Bg8 (20... h6 {does not solve anything} 21. Bxh6 $1 {Mate attack} Rd8 22. Bg5+ Kg8 23. Bxf6 Qc7 24. Rad1 gxf6 25. Qg6+ Kf8 26. Qxf6+ Kg8 27. Qxe6+ Kg7 28. Qg6+ Kh8 29. Rxd8+ Qxd8 30. Nf7#) 21. Ng6# 1-0

16 Nov 2015

B73 Sicilian Dragon: Classical System without 9.Nb3 (1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be2 Bg7 7.Be3 O-O 8.O-O Nc6 9.f3 Bd7 10.Qd2 a6)

B73 Sicilian Dragon: Classical System without 9.Nb3 (1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be2 Bg7 7.Be3 O-O 8.O-O Nc6 9.f3 Bd7 10.Qd2 a6)

My plan for this week was to add four analysed chess games and one analysed chess960 every day from Monday to Friday, but as I went through my recently ended correspondence games, I noticed that I have new opening variations to go through. It means that I will not post maybe as many games as I intended during this week, but it will be the maximum amount of games I will post per a posting day. This helps me to plan things further ahead than I would be able to in the way I did things in the past. When I have looked through all of these opening variations, I have noticed one thing that annoys me a bit, the name of the variations differ sometimes from source to source and there are other differences as well, for instance, not all of the opening variations can be found in all of the sources which in turn makes my job of finding openings played in the games all that more difficult. All I want is some consistency and a list of truly all the openings that exist in one place. Then again I have differed in the naming of some of my posts from the more usual names for the opening, the best example of this is all the posts I have named starting with Spanish Game, but I guess most people would name it Ruy Lopez. I guess the main reason for the naming was that in the original source where I looked these openings used Spanish Game, so it has stuck with me since those times.

The game below was played in a team match called Purple Bhangra punjabi style. The match was played on 33 boards between PURPLE HAZE and PAOK. I played on board 3 for PURPLE HAZE against a clearly stronger opponent. We ended up being crushed quite badly in this match as the final score 10.5 - 55.5 demonstrates. I have added one analysed game to my post: C45 Scotch Game: Schmidt Variation. I have also added one mate in two, one mate in three, two mate in four and one mate in five puzzle today.

This paragraph and the ones that follow it have been added November 25th, 2016. I was able to hang on in the game against my stronger opponent until it came time to play my 34th move in the position below. I played 34.Qe1 allowing a tactic that won the game for my opponent. I should have played 34.Qb2 to stay in the game. Note that 34...Nxd5 would be met with 35.Qh8#.

The move I played in the game allowed my opponent to play 34...Nxd5. I then took on d5 with the bishop and I was momentarily up on material. The problem with the move 35.Bxd5 is that now my opponent can invade on the second rank with the rook. I could not reply to 35...Rc2+ with 36.Re2 because then my opponent would have played 36...Qxe1! My rook could not take back because the rook is pinned. Therefore I moved my king instead. I moved my king to h3, which was probably the worst square to the king. I should have played 36.Kf1, even though I was probably lost regardless. I resigned after 37...Qh8+ in a position where I was still up in material, but I faced a forced mate.

[Event "Purple Bhangra punjabi style - Board 3"] [Site "Chess.com"] [Date "2015.08.20"] [Round "?"] [White "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Black "Killerinstrict"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B73"] [WhiteElo "1872"] [BlackElo "2120"] [Annotator "Stockfish 8 64 POPCNT (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "74"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be2 Bg7 7. Be3 { Sicilian Defense: Dragon Variation. Classical Variation} O-O 8. O-O Nc6 9. f3 ( 9. Nb3 Be6 (9... a5 {Sicilian Defense: Dragon Variation, Classical Variation, Alekhine Line}) 10. f4 Qc8 {Sicilian Defense: Dragon Variation, Classical Variation, Tartakower Line} (10... Na5 11. f5 Bc4 12. Nxa5 Bxe2 13. Qxe2 Qxa5 14. g4 {Sicilian Defense: Dragon Variation, Classical Variation, Stockholm Attack})) 9... Bd7 10. Qd2 a6 {B73 Sicilian Dragon: Classical System without 9. Nb3} 11. Nxc6 Bxc6 12. Kh1 (12. Nd5 Bxd5 (12... b5 13. c4 bxc4 14. Bxc4 Nxd5 15. exd5 Bb5 16. Rac1 Rb8 17. b3 Qd7 18. Bxb5 Rxb5 19. Rc6 e6 20. Rxa6 Rxd5 21. Qb4 Rd3 22. Qb6 d5 23. Ra7 Qc8 24. Rc7 Qd8 25. Rfc1 d4 26. Bf2 Rc3 27. Qb7 { Klausmeier,A (1769)-Boshe Plois,S (1778) Germany 2015 0-1 (32)}) 13. exd5 Rc8 14. c4 Nd7 15. Rac1 a5 16. Rfe1 Nc5 17. Bf1 Re8 18. Rc2 Qb6 19. Kh1 Bf6 20. b3 Ra8 21. Rb1 Qc7 22. Qf2 Ra7 23. g3 Rb8 24. Bh3 b6 25. Qd2 Qb7 26. a4 Re8 { Sarbok,T (2319)-Gasanov,E (2514) Rijeka 2010 1/2-1/2}) 12... Rc8 13. Bh6 Qb6 $146 (13... b5 14. Bxg7 Kxg7 15. a3 Qc7 16. Rac1 Rfd8 17. Nd5 Bxd5 18. exd5 Qb7 19. c4 bxc4 20. Bxc4 Ra8 21. Rfe1 Rd7 22. b3 Rc7 23. Rc3 Rac8 24. Rd3 Rc5 25. Rd4 h6 26. Rh4 g5 27. Rd4 Nh7 28. g4 {Dang,T-Nguyen Ngoc Phuong,K Vung Tau 2005 1-0 (40)}) (13... Bxh6 14. Qxh6 Qb6 15. Rab1 $11) 14. Bxg7 $11 Kxg7 { Black king safety dropped} 15. Rab1 Rfd8 16. Nd5 Bxd5 17. exd5 Qc5 18. c4 b5 19. b3 bxc4 20. Bxc4 a5 21. Rfe1 {White threatens to win material: Re1xe7} Rc7 22. Re2 Qb4 23. Qd3 a4 24. Rbe1 Rdd7 25. Re3 axb3 26. Bxb3 {White has a new passed pawn: a2.} (26. axb3 Qb7 $11) 26... Rc5 27. Rd1 (27. Rxe7 Rxe7 28. Rxe7 Rc1+ 29. Bd1 Qc4 30. Re3 Nxd5 31. h3 Nxe3 32. Qxe3 Rxd1+ 33. Kh2 h5 34. Qf2 Qc1 35. f4 h4 36. g3 Rd2 37. Kg2 Rxf2+ 38. Kxf2 Qd2+ 39. Kf3 Qd3+ 40. Kf2 hxg3+ 41. Ke1 Qe3+ 42. Kd1 g2 43. a3 g1=Q+ 44. Kc2 Qgc1#) 27... Rdc7 28. g3 h5 29. Qe2 Rc1 (29... Kf8 30. Kg1 $15) 30. Kg2 Rxd1 31. Qxd1 h4 32. Qe2 hxg3 (32... Qd4 33. Rxe7 Rc1 34. Qe3 Qb2+ 35. Qe2 $15) 33. hxg3 Kf8 34. Qe1 (34. Qb2 $5 $11 { deserves consideration}) 34... Nxd5 35. Bxd5 Rc2+ 36. Kh3 $4 {another step towards the grave} (36. Kf1 $142 Qb5+ 37. Re2 Rxe2 38. Qxe2 Qxd5 39. a4 $17) 36... Qb2 $19 37. Bxf7 Qh8+ (37... Qh8+ 38. Kg4 Qh5+ 39. Kf4 Qf5#) 0-1

13 Nov 2015

Chess960 SP450

Chess960 SP450

This was played at the Internet Chess Club today and this is my second ever chess960 game that I have played there. This was not a rated game and that fact I actually noticed only after I had played this game. I forgot that when I had previously played at ICC, I had played unrated games against a friend of mine and did not remember to change the challenge settings, so that I would be playing rated games again. It does not matter all that much, but the rated games bring a bit more added importance to the games in my opinion. This was also the first time that I played chess960 with 10 minute time controls, when I played a hundred game match against a friend of mine with those time controls, I realised that the time controls seem to work well for me. It is not as hasty as 5 minute games, but also not as time consuming as 15 minute games which I have previously preferred for rapid games. Well, I guess 10 minutes is still considered as blitz, so never mind. I thought I would also do live commentary for the game, which I did, but I am not sure if it is good enough to be posted for Youtube, for example. I did like my commentary when I did it, but after listening to it myself when I checked the video afterwards, I was less confident about the quality of it. I think I will do some live commentary for the next chess960 10 minute games and see if there will be something worth posting, because it would be alternative way to do things and nice way to do something different for a change.

I noticed when I looked this game in Chessbase 12 after the game that this one also had problems with the notation. Again starting from the point where castles was made. So I closed Chessbase 12 and opened the pgn-file with Notepad. I looked at where this line [Variant "Chess960"] was, a bit more closely now than I did with the game I posted yesterday and realised when comparing to working pgn-file of chess960 games that the variant name was not in a form that Chessbase understands it. I changed that line to look like this [Variant "chess 960"] as it was in the working pgn-file, saved the file and opened the file in Chessbase 12 again. I was really happy to realise that the game notation was working properly and I did not have to make the moves again starting from castling in order to make it work. I am not 100% sure why the notation in the other game required for me to input the moves again, but it might be something to do with the fact that I had not closed Chessbase 12 yesterday when I attempted to correct the notation. I have added two mate in two, two mate in five and one mate in six puzzle today. Until Monday, my fellow chess and chess960 enthusiasts!

12 Nov 2015

Chess960 SP74

Chess960 SP74

Time for some chess960 once again. After this game, all my chess960 games that I have a notation for, have appeared in the blog. This took a long time to publish because the pgn-file had the moves, but it was missing one line of code that I only today added after I investigated what was wrong with the pgn-file. I could have of course done this a lot earlier, had I took the time to see why the moves were not correctly shown at Chessbase. The problem that caused the moves to be shown in some parts of the game without a move number, was due to the fact that the pgn-file was missing this very important line [Variant "chess 960"]. Without this line, the program does not understand castling in chess960, which is why immediately when the move 12...O-O was in the notation, the rest of it was not shown properly anymore. I did have to make the moves again starting from that 12...O-O to get the full game properly working, I did try to do that without tempering with the pgn-file but it did not obviously work. I did look at the original pgn-file where the ICC client had originally put it, but it seemed at first glance like a proper pgn-file, but somehow it had the same problem as the copied version that had that line missing. So, I am not sure what was wrong with the original to cause these problems and it does not matter all that much because I was able to make it work and I am happy with that. I think I will play a game of chess960 today or tomorrow so that I have something new to post for tomorrow. I would have lot of chess games that I could post, but so far I have not been able to find any new openings, so it will be on hold until I discover something new. Or I should propably say that it is unlikely that I would post any chess games this week, but next week I will post those again, maybe four per day and one new chess960 starting position each day between Monday and Friday that is. That is the plan for next week, time will tell how well I succeed in that... I have added one mate in one, one mate in three, two mate in four and one mate in 28 puzzle today. If you look at the last one, you will realise why I decided to post a mate in so many moves.

11 Nov 2015

E12 Queen's Indian: Unusual White 4th moves, 4.a3, 4.Nc3 Bb7 5.a3 and 4.Nc3 Bb7 (1.Nf3 d5 2.d4 e6 3.c4 Nf6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bg5 Nbd7 6.e3 O-O 7.cxd5 Nxd5 8.Bxe7 Qxe7 9.Bd3 b6 10.Rc1 Bb7 11.O-O c5)

E12 Queen's Indian: Unusual White 4th moves, 4.a3, 4.Nc3 Bb7 5.a3 and 4.Nc3 Bb7 (1.Nf3 d5 2.d4 e6 3.c4 Nf6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bg5 Nbd7 6.e3 O-O 7.cxd5 Nxd5 8.Bxe7 Qxe7 9.Bd3 b6 10.Rc1 Bb7 11.O-O c5)

The move order in the game below is not the one you would find in theory, the theoretical move order for this variation is 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.e3 O-O 6.Nf3 Nbd7. I should maybe point out from now on if the move order played in the games differs from the theoretical one, so that there are no misunderstandings. Sometimes in my older posts I have pointed out the difference, but not in all of the posts where it has been the case. The game below was played in a club tournament that I participated in 2004. For some reason or the other, I have not marked the round from which this game is from and it kind of annoys me, because it would be interesting for me to know now. If only I could go back in time to correct this and many other things that my current knowledge would fix in my past. Then again tempering with the past might not be that good of an idea and I could make things even worse trying to fix things.

Even though I am not sure of the round on which the game below was played in, I think I know at least one other score from this same tournament, I won my other game from this same tournament, but I had not marked the round it was from either, so I can't really say for certain what the rounds were. This was played later than the other game, so this is at least from round two, but it might be from a later round as well. I could of course check if my opponent has the notation for this game still somewhere and maybe get an answer to this "mystery".

[Event "Kerhoturnaus"] [Site "?"] [Date "2004.06.16"] [Round "?"] [White "Tocklin, Tomi"] [Black "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E12"] [Annotator "Stockfish 6 64 BMI2 (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "35"] [EventDate "2004.05.19"] 1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 e6 3. c4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bg5 Nbd7 6. e3 O-O {Queen's Gambit Declined: Orthodox Defense} 7. cxd5 (7. Bd3 {Queen's Gambit Declined: Orthodox Defense, Botvinnik Variation}) (7. Qb3 {Queen's Gambit Declined: Orthodox Defense, Rauzer Variation}) (7. Qc2 c5 8. cxd5 {Queen's Gambit Declined: Orthodox Defense, Rubinstein Variation, Flohr Line}) 7... Nxd5 8. Bxe7 Qxe7 9. Bd3 b6 10. Rc1 Bb7 11. O-O c5 {E12 Queen's Indian: Unusual White 4th moves, 4. a3, 4.Nc3 Bb7 5.a3 and 4.Nc3 Bb7} 12. e4 cxd4 {N} (12... Nf4 13. Bb1 cxd4 ( 13... Ba6 14. Re1 cxd4 15. Qxd4 Nc5 16. Rcd1 {1/2-1/2 (16) Schneider,S (2320) -Krejci, J (2140) Pardubice 1998}) 14. Nxd4 Qg5 15. Qf3 Ne5 16. Qg3 Qf6 17. Nde2 Neg6 18. Nxf4 Nxf4 19. Rfd1 Rfd8 20. Qe3 e5 21. a3 Bc6 22. b4 Bd7 23. Nd5 Qg5 24. Nxf4 exf4 25. Qe2 Be6 26. f3 h5 27. Kh1 {Gonzalez Velazquez, A-Valenzuela Martinez,H (1770) Aguascalientes 2009 1/2-1/2 (56)}) (12... Nxc3 13. bxc3 cxd4 14. cxd4 Rfc8 15. Qe2 Qa3 16. Rc2 Rxc2 17. Qxc2 Rc8 18. Qb3 Qxb3 19. axb3 Rc3 20. Bb5 Nf6 21. e5 Nd5 22. Nd2 Nc7 23. Be2 Kf8 24. f4 Rc2 25. Rd1 Nd5 26. Bd3 Ra2 27. Bb1 {Danjec,V-Zivanovic,N (2198) Golubac 2008 0-1 (38)}) 13. exd5 (13. Nxd5 exd5 14. exd5 Bxd5 15. Nxd4 g6 {=}) 13... dxc3 {=/+} 14. dxe6 Qxe6 (14... fxe6 $5 15. Rxc3 Bxf3 16. gxf3 Rad8 {=/+}) 15. Bxh7+ {=} Kh8 16. Ng5 {White threatens to win material: Ng5xe6} (16. Rxc3 Bxf3 17. Rxf3 Kxh7 18. Re1 {=}) 16... Qc6 $4 {lets it slip away} (16... Qd5 {this is the best way to fight back} 17. Qxd5 Bxd5 {=}) 17. Be4 {+-} Qc7 (17... Qh6 {otherwise it's curtains at once} 18. Bxb7 Rad8 19. Nxf7+ Rxf7 20. Rxc3 Qf6 21. Rh3+ Kg8 {+-}) 18. Qh5+ (18. Qh5+ Kg8 19. Qh7#) 1-0

10 Nov 2015

D71 Fianchetto Grünfeld: 3.g3 d5 sidelines and 5.cxd5 (without Nf3) (1.c4 Nf6 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Nc3 Nxc3 6.bxc3 c5 7.d4 Bg7)

D71 Fianchetto Grünfeld: 3.g3 d5 sidelines and 5.cxd5 (without Nf3) (1.c4 Nf6 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Nc3 Nxc3 6.bxc3 c5 7.d4 Bg7)

This is the 1100th analysed chess game to appear in this blog!! It seems like a lot, but I still have a lot more of my games to go through. Those 1100 games feature 432 different opening variations, 668 (60.73%) wins, 102 (9.27%) draws and 330 (30%) losses. The more I post these games, the more unfavorable the statistics are for me, winning percentage decreases and losing percentage increases which is not the way I would like it to go. We shall see where it will go in the future as we come closer to the actual current statistics. The best opening variations that I have played more than 10 games in are C50 Italian Game: Italian Variation with a 75 % winning chance (20 games played), C45 Scotch Game: General with a 72.73 % winning chance (11 games played) and B92 Sicilian Defense: Najdorf Variation. Opocensky Variation with also 72.73 % winning chance (11 games played). The worst openings for me that I have played more than 10 times are C64 Spanish Game: Classical Variation. Charousek Variation with a 50 % losing chance (14 games played), C34 King's Gambit: Accepted. Fischer Defense with a 42.11 % losing chance (19 games played) and A15 English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. Mikenas-Carls Variation with a 41.67 % losing chance (24 games played). According to these statistics, it would seem clear what sort of openings I should try to steer the games for, but because these only take in consideration a small part of the games I have played, I can't rely too much on these statistics.

The game below was played in the fifth and final round of the tournament that was held at Turku over eleven years ago. If my memory serves me right, this was the first over the board game where I faced a female opponent, well as far as the official games are concerned that is. I started this tournament with a win, but then I lost a game and on the third round I won my second game and continued winning on the fourth round, so I had three wins and one loss before this final round game. Luckily this loss did not interfere my rating climb, but it did make it a smaller one that I was used to in previous tournaments. My rating only climbed eight points to 1714, but it was yet another highest rating ever that point in time, so I was still going into the right direction, but not as fast as before.

[Event "TSY"] [Site "?"] [Date "2004.04.25"] [Round "5"] [White "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Black "Matomäki, Kaisa"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D71"] [WhiteElo "1706"] [BlackElo "1771"] [Annotator "Stockfish 6 64 BMI2 (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "100"] [EventDate "2004.04.23"] 1. c4 Nf6 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Nc3 Nxc3 {English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense, Anglo-Grünfeld Variation} (5... Nb6 {English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense, Anglo-Grünfeld Variation (#2)}) 6. bxc3 c5 7. d4 Bg7 { D71 Fianchetto Grünfeld: 3.g3 d5 sidelines and 5.cxd5 (without Nf3)} 8. Bb2 ( 8. Nf3 cxd4 9. cxd4 Nc6 10. O-O O-O 11. Rb1 b6 12. d5 Bf5 13. Rb5 Na5 14. Nd4 Bd7 15. Rb1 Rc8 16. Bb2 Qc7 17. Ba3 Qe5 18. Nf3 {1/2-1/2 (18) Ponomariov,R (2758)-Svidler,P (2740) Rogaska Slatina 2011}) 8... Qa5 {N} (8... Nc6 9. e3 Bf5 10. e4 Bd7 11. Ne2 Na5 12. Rb1 O-O 13. O-O Nc4 14. Ba1 Rb8 15. Nf4 Qa5 16. e5 Ba4 17. Qc1 Bc6 18. Nd5 Kh8 19. Rd1 cxd4 20. Nf4 Bxg2 21. Kxg2 Qxe5 22. Re1 Qd6 23. cxd4 {Nguyen,V (1656)-Tran,M (2053) Ho Chi Minh City 2014 0-1 (45)}) (8... cxd4 9. cxd4 Qa5+ 10. Qd2 Qxd2+ 11. Kxd2 O-O 12. e3 Na6 13. Ba3 Re8 14. f4 Rb8 15. Rb1 Bf8 16. Ne2 e6 17. Bxf8 Kxf8 18. Nc3 Nc7 19. Rhc1 b6 20. Ne4 Nd5 21. Nd6 Rd8 22. Nxc8 Rbxc8 23. Bf1 {Aubry,Y (2170)-Marie,X (1826) Domloup 2013 1-0 (48)}) (8... O-O 9. Nf3 Qa5 10. O-O Rd8 11. Qc2 Nc6 12. Rfd1 cxd4 13. Nxd4 Bd7 14. Nxc6 Bxc6 15. Bxc6 bxc6 16. a4 c5 17. Qe4 e6 18. Qc4 Rab8 19. Rxd8+ Rxd8 20. Qb5 Bxc3 21. Bxc3 Qxc3 22. Rb1 Qc2 23. Kg2 {Luuppala,J-Owczarzak,J (2205) Mureck 1998 0-1 (75)}) 9. Nf3 cxd4 10. Nxd4 O-O 11. O-O Rd8 12. Qb3 Qc7 (12... e5 13. Nc2 {=}) 13. f4 (13. Rad1 $5 {is worth consideration} Nc6 14. Nxc6 bxc6 15. Rxd8+ Qxd8 16. Bxc6 {=}) 13... Nc6 {=/+ The knight aims for Nb8-c6-a5-c4. Black threatens to win material: Nc6xd4} 14. Rad1 Bg4 15. Rfe1 Na5 16. Qb4 Nc4 {A comfortable square for the black knight} 17. h3 Bd7 18. e4 $4 {another bit of territory lost} (18. Bc1 {+/-}) 18... e5 (18... a5 {and Black can already relax} 19. Qb3 Ba4 20. Qxa4 Nxb2 21. Qb3 Nxd1 22. Rxd1 {-+}) 19. fxe5 (19. Ba1 a5 20. Qb3 a4 {-+}) 19... Bxe5 (19... a5 {keeps an even firmer grip} 20. Qb3 Ba4 21. Qxa4 Nxb2 22. Qb3 Nxd1 23. Rxd1 Bxe5 24. Rf1 {-+}) 20. g4 $4 {sad, but how else could White save the game?} (20. Bc1 {-+}) 20... Bd6 (20... a5 $5 { seems even better} 21. Qb3 Ba4 22. Qxa4 Nxb2 23. Qb3 Nxd1 24. Rxd1 {-+}) 21. Qb3 Ba4 $3 {Deflection: b2} 22. Qxa4 Nxb2 23. Qb3 Nxd1 24. Rxd1 Rac8 25. Rf1 Rd7 26. Nb5 (26. Qa4 {is no salvation} a6 27. Kh1 Be5 {-+}) 26... Qc5+ 27. Kh1 Qe5 (27... Be5 $5 {might be the shorter path} 28. Nd4 Bxd4 29. cxd4 Qxd4 30. Qg3 {-+}) 28. Nxd6 Qxd6 (28... Rxd6 $6 29. Qxf7+ Kh8 30. Qxb7 {+/-}) 29. c4 Qd3 30. Qa4 (30. Qxd3 {does not improve anything} Rxd3 31. Rc1 b6 {-+}) 30... Rdc7 31. Qxa7 (31. e5 {doesn't improve anything} b6 {-+}) 31... Qxc4 (31... b5 { makes it even easier for Black} 32. Qa6 bxc4 33. e5 {-+}) 32. Rb1 (32. Qa5 { doesn't change the outcome of the game} Rd7 33. a3 Qe2 {-+}) 32... Qa6 (32... Qd3 {secures the point} 33. Rf1 Rc1 34. Qf2 Rxf1+ 35. Bxf1 {-+}) 33. Qxa6 bxa6 34. Rb6 (34. Bf1 {doesn't get the bull off the ice} a5 35. a4 Rc2 {-+}) 34... Rc6 35. Rb3 Rc1+ 36. Kh2 R8c2 37. Ra3 (37. a3 {-+ desperation}) 37... Ra1 ( 37... Re2 38. Kg3 Rg1 39. Rxa6 Rgxg2+ 40. Kf4 Rxa2 41. Rb6 Raf2+ 42. Ke3 {-+}) 38. Rxa6 Raxa2 39. Rxa2 Rxa2 40. Kg3 (40. g5 {what else?} Ra3 41. e5 {-+}) 40... g5 41. Kh2 Kg7 42. Kg3 Kf6 43. Bf3 Ke5 44. Bg2 Rxg2+ 45. Kxg2 Kxe4 46. Kg3 (46. Kf2 {does not help much} Kf4 47. Kg2 Ke3 48. Kg3 f6 49. Kg2 Ke2 50. Kg3 Kf1 51. h4 gxh4+ 52. Kh2 Kf2 53. Kh3 Kg1 54. Kxh4 Kg2 55. g5 f5 56. Kh5 Kg3 57. Kh6 Kg4 58. g6 hxg6 59. Kg7 f4 60. Kf6 f3 61. Ke5 f2 62. Kd6 f1=Q 63. Kc5 Kf4 64. Kb4 Qa6 65. Kc5 Ke4 66. Kb4 Kd4 67. Kb3 Qa1 68. Kb4 Qb1+ 69. Ka3 Kc3 70. Ka4 Qb4#) 46... Ke3 47. h4 (47. Kg2 {does not win a prize} f6 48. Kg3 Ke2 49. Kg2 h6 50. Kg3 Kf1 51. Kf3 Kg1 52. Kg3 Kh1 53. h4 gxh4+ 54. Kh3 Kg1 55. Kxh4 Kh2 56. Kh5 Kh3 57. g5 fxg5 58. Kxh6 g4 59. Kg5 g3 60. Kf4 g2 61. Ke5 g1=Q 62. Kd6 Qb6+ 63. Kd5 Kg3 64. Kc4 Kf4 65. Kd5 Qb5+ 66. Ke6 Qc6+ 67. Kf7 Kf5 68. Kf8 Kf6 69. Kg8 Qg2+ 70. Kh8 Qg7#) 47... h6 48. Kg2 (48. h5 {cannot change destiny} Ke4 49. Kf2 Kf4 50. Ke2 Kxg4 51. Ke3 f5 52. Ke2 f4 53. Kf2 Kf5 54. Ke1 Ke4 55. Kd1 g4 56. Ke1 g3 57. Kf1 Ke3 58. Kg2 Ke2 59. Kg1 f3 60. Kh1 Ke3 61. Kg1 g2 62. Kh2 Kf2 63. Kh3 g1=Q 64. Kh4 Qg3#) 48... Kf4 49. Kh3 (49. hxg5 { doesn't do any good} hxg5 50. Kf2 Kxg4 51. Ke2 Kf4 52. Kd3 g4 53. Kd2 g3 54. Ke2 Ke4 55. Ke1 Kf3 56. Kd1 g2 57. Kc1 g1=Q+ 58. Kb2 Ke2 59. Kc2 Qc5+ 60. Kb3 Kd3 61. Kb2 Qb4+ 62. Ka1 Kc2 63. Ka2 Qb2#) 49... Kf3 50. h5 (50. hxg5 {doesn't change anything anymore} hxg5 51. Kh2 Kxg4 52. Kg2 Kf4 53. Kf1 Kf3 54. Ke1 g4 55. Kd2 g3 56. Kc3 g2 57. Kc4 g1=Q 58. Kb5 Ke4 59. Kc6 Ke5 60. Kb5 Kd5 61. Kb4 Qg3 62. Kb5 Qb3+ 63. Ka6 Kc6 64. Ka5 Qa3#) 50... f6 (50... f6 51. Kh2 Kxg4 52. Kg2 Kf4 53. Kf1 g4 54. Ke1 Ke3 55. Kf1 Kf3 56. Ke1 g3 57. Kd1 g2 58. Kc1 g1=Q+ 59. Kc2 Ke4 60. Kc3 Qd4+ 61. Kc2 Qb4 62. Kd1 Kd3 63. Kc1 Qb6 64. Kd1 Qb1#) 0-1

9 Nov 2015

D34 Tarrasch Defence: 6.g3 Nf6 7.Bg2 Be7 (1.c4 Nf6 2.g3 e6 3.Bg2 d5 4.d4 c5 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.cxd5 exd5 7.Nf3 Be7 8.O-O O-O 9.Bg5 cxd4 10.Nxd4 h6 11.Bf4 Bg4 12.Rc1)

D34 Tarrasch Defence: 6.g3 Nf6 7.Bg2 Be7 (1.c4 Nf6 2.g3 e6 3.Bg2 d5 4.d4 c5 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.cxd5 exd5 7.Nf3 Be7 8.O-O O-O 9.Bg5 cxd4 10.Nxd4 h6 11.Bf4 Bg4 12.Rc1)

The game below is my only game against FIDE Master Tapio Salo that I have a notation of. If I recall correctly, we have only played two games against each other and this game is from a simultaneous exhibition that he gave at the club in March 27th 2004. After the simultaneous exhibition we played a blitz tournament where I was able to get my first win against a titled player. It was the second time I played against him and I have to admit that the blitz game was won on time. If my memory serves me right, the final position in that game consisted of me having one pawn and a king and my opponent had two connected pawns and a king. I can't remember the exact location of those pieces anymore unfortunately, but I do remember that those were all that remained on the board. After this day, I have won two International Masters, played a draw against another FIDE Master and won a few National Masters, not sure about the exact count, since I have not kept track of those. I have not won any games against Grandmasters and since I play against them very rarely, I do not really have all that many chances to do that. I have played against maybe two Grandmasters and only once against both of them, both I lost, which is of course not a surprise. I am not saying that I could consistently win games against FIDE Masters or International Masters or other traditional chess titled players, but maybe if some of them are not at their best anymore, I may have a chance against them. I used the term traditional chess titles to describe the titles that existed before the addition of the new FIDE Online Arena titles for amateur players.

[Event "Simultaani"] [Site "?"] [Date "2004.03.27"] [Round "?"] [White "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Black "Salo, Tapio"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D34"] [WhiteElo "1706"] [BlackElo "2253"] [Annotator "Stockfish 6 64 BMI2 (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "46"] [EventDate "2004.??.??"] [EventType "rapid"] 1. c4 Nf6 2. g3 e6 3. Bg2 d5 4. d4 c5 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. cxd5 exd5 7. Nf3 Be7 8. O-O O-O 9. Bg5 {Tarrasch Defense: Classical Variation, Carlsbad Variation} cxd4 10. Nxd4 h6 11. Bf4 (11. Be3 Re8 (11... Bg4 {Tarrasch Defense: Classical Variation, Spassky Variation}) 12. Rc1 Be6 {Tarrasch Defense: Classical Variation, Chandler Variation}) 11... Bg4 12. Rc1 {D34 Tarrasch Defence: 6.g3 Nf6 7.Bg2 Be7} Re8 (12... Qd7 13. Qd3 Rad8 14. Rfd1 Rfe8 15. Nxc6 {Adianto,U (2610) -Magomedov,M (2460) Dubai 1996}) 13. Ndb5 {N The pressure on the isolated pawn grows} (13. Nxc6 bxc6 14. Na4 Qa5 15. f3 Bf5 16. Be3 Rac8 17. Bc5 Qa6 18. Rf2 Bxc5 19. Rxc5 Re3 20. Bf1 Nd7 21. Rc1 Qa5 22. Qd4 Ree8 23. b3 Be6 24. Rc2 c5 25. Nxc5 Nxc5 26. b4 Qa4 27. Rxc5 Rxc5 {Shaidullina,S (2182)-Shadrina,T (2340) Serpukhov 2001 0-1 (57)}) (13. h3 Be6 14. Ncb5 Nh5 15. Be3 Qd7 16. Nxe6 fxe6 17. Nd4 Nf6 18. Nxc6 bxc6 19. Qa4 c5 20. Qa5 c4 21. Rfd1 Bd6 22. Bd4 Qe7 23. Kh2 Rab8 24. f4 Bb4 25. Qa4 Bc5 26. Be5 Rb4 27. Qc2 Be3 {Szamos,A (2175) -Singliar,A (2180) Slovakia 1999 1-0 (71)}) (13. h3 Bh5 {+/=}) 13... Rc8 14. Nxd5 Nxd5 15. Bxd5 ({Inferior is} 15. Qxd5 Bxe2 16. Qxd8 Rexd8 (16... Nxd8 $4 17. Rxc8 Bxb5 18. Re1 {+-}) (16... Rcxd8 $6 17. Nc7 Bxf1 18. Rxf1 {+/-}) (16... Bxd8 17. Nd6 Bxf1 18. Kxf1 {+/-} (18. Nxe8 $6 Bxg2 19. Kxg2 Be7 {=}) (18. Rxf1 Bb6 {+/=}) (18. Bxf1 $6 Bc7 19. Nxc8 Bxf4 20. gxf4 Rxc8 {=})) 17. Rxc6 Rxc6 ( 17... Bxb5 {is clearly weaker} 18. Rxc8 Rxc8 19. Bxb7 {+/-}) 18. Bxc6 Bxf1 ( 18... bxc6 $6 19. Re1 Bf3 20. Nc3 {=/+} (20. Nxa7 $2 {doesn't work because of} Bc5 {-+})) 19. Kxf1 bxc6 20. Nxa7 Rd1+ 21. Ke2 Ra1 22. Nxc6 Bc5 {+/-}) 15... Qa5 (15... Nb4 16. Bf3 Rxc1 17. Bxc1 Bxf3 18. exf3 Nxa2 19. Qxd8 Bxd8 20. Be3 { =}) 16. Nc3 {Black has an active position} (16. Qb3 $5 Kh8 17. Bxf7 {+/-}) 16... Bb4 (16... Red8 17. Qd3 Nb4 18. Qg6 Nxd5 19. Qxg4 Nxf4 20. gxf4 {=} (20. Qxf4 $2 Bg5 21. Qe4 Bxc1 22. Rxc1 b5 {+/-})) 17. Bxc6 (17. Be3 Rcd8 18. Qb3 Ne5 19. Bxb7 Be6 {=}) 17... bxc6 (17... Rxc6 18. Re1 {=/+}) 18. f3 (18. Re1 { !? = has some apparent merit}) 18... Bh3 {+/-} 19. Re1 $4 {another step towards the grave} (19. Rf2 {+/-}) 19... Qb6+ {-+} 20. Kh1 (20. e3 {is the last straw} g5 21. Bxg5 hxg5 22. Na4 {-+}) 20... Qf2 (20... Rcd8 $5 {might be the shorter path} 21. Qxd8 Rxd8 22. Rf1 {-+}) 21. Rg1 Bxc3 22. Rxc3 Rxe2 23. g4 (23. Qxe2 {hardly improves anything} Qxe2 24. Re3 Qf2 25. Rd3 Re8 26. Be5 Rxe5 27. Rd8+ Kh7 28. Rd2 Qxf3+ 29. Rdg2 Bxg2+ 30. Rxg2 Re1#) 23... Bg2+ (23... Bg2+ 24. Rxg2 Qxg2#) 0-1

6 Nov 2015

A25 English Opening vs King's Indian with ...Nc6 but without early d3 (1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.e3 Nge7 6.Nge2 d6 7.d4 O-O 8.O-O)

A25 English Opening vs King's Indian with ...Nc6 but without early d3 (1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.e3 Nge7 6.Nge2 d6 7.d4 O-O 8.O-O)

This was played in the fifth round of Rilton Cup Open that I played in 2003. This tournament is the only one that I have played abroad and will most likely be the last one that I will ever play abroad. This has also been the only tournament that I did not play on every round. I think the game below was the last one I played, so I missed a couple of rounds. The reason why I did not play on all rounds was that I got sick and could not play. It was quite disappointing but what can you do. This was a really interesting experience for me, however as I was able to see some chess legends live, like Viktor Korchnoi and Mark Taimanov. For that reason alone it was the right time to go play that tournament. It is something that I am unlikely to forget. The playing part, however, did not go all that well, I was able to start with a win but then I lost two games in a row and on the fourth round I drew a game against a higher rated opponent. I was able to get only 1.5 out of 5, so no wonder I got sick... Or maybe the poor play was due to the fact I was getting sick. Nah, in all honesty, I just did not play well enough to get more points and at the time these players played better chess than I did. Who knows, they might play better chess than me nowadays too. Until Moday, my fellow chess enthusiasts!

[Event "Rilton Cup Open"] [Site "?"] [Date "2003.12.31"] [Round "5"] [White "Lanvin, Pär"] [Black "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A25"] [WhiteElo "1824"] [BlackElo "1612"] [Annotator "Stockfish 6 64 BMI2 (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "63"] [EventDate "2003.12.30"] 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 {English Opening: King's English Variation, Taimanov Variation} 5. e3 (5. d3 d6 6. e4 {English Opening: King's English Variation, Botvinnik System}) 5... Nge7 (5... d6 6. Nge2 Be6 {English Opening: King's English Variation, Bremen-Hort Variation} (6... Nh6 {English Opening: Closed, Taimanov Variation})) 6. Nge2 d6 7. d4 O-O 8. O-O {A25 English Opening vs King's Indian with ...Nc6 but without early d3} f5 9. Rb1 ( 9. d5 Nb8 10. e4 Nd7 11. h3 Nf6 12. exf5 Nxf5 13. b3 Bd7 14. Bb2 {0-1 (14) Stipic,M (2185)-Brkic,I (2184) Zadar 2008}) (9. a3 g5 10. Nd5 Ng6 11. dxe5 Ngxe5 12. Ra2 Nxc4 13. Nxc7 Qxc7 14. Bd5+ Kh8 15. Bxc4 Nb4 16. axb4 Qxc4 17. b3 Qxb4 18. Ba3 Qb6 19. Rd2 Be6 20. Rxd6 Qxb3 21. Qxb3 Bxb3 22. Rb1 Bc4 23. Nd4 b5 {Salcedo,J (2027)-Cespedes Galindo,E (1730) Barrancabermeja 2015 1/2-1/2 (39)}) 9... e4 {N Black gains space} (9... f4 10. gxf4 exd4 11. exd4 Bg4 12. Be3 Nf5 13. h3 Bh5 14. Qd2 Nh4 15. Ng3 Bf3 16. Bh1 Qd7 17. f5 Bxh1 18. Kxh1 Nxf5 19. Nxf5 Rxf5 20. Kg2 Raf8 21. f4 Ne7 22. Ne4 d5 23. Ng3 R5f7 24. c5 {Paszewski,M (1805)-Polok,K (1981) Karpacz 2010 0-1 (44)}) (9... a5 10. a3 Kh8 (10... g5 11. f4 gxf4 12. gxf4 Ng6 13. dxe5 dxe5 14. Qxd8 Nxd8 15. Nd5 Ne6 16. Bd2 Ra6 { 1/2-1/2 (16) Suslova,A (2184)-Korniyuk,M (2009) Herceg Novi 2008}) 11. b4 axb4 12. axb4 Ng8 13. b5 Nce7 14. Bb2 g5 15. f4 gxf4 16. exf4 e4 17. d5 Nf6 18. Nd4 Bd7 19. Qd2 Qc8 20. Nd1 Ra2 21. Ne3 c6 22. dxc6 bxc6 23. bxc6 Bxc6 24. Rfc1 { Mittag,R (2123)-Seidel,M (1947) Bayern 2014 1-0 (42)}) (9... f4 10. gxf4 exd4 11. exd4 {=}) 10. b4 d5 (10... a6 11. f3 exf3 12. Bxf3 {+/=}) 11. cxd5 (11. f3 dxc4 12. b5 exf3 13. Bxf3 Nb8 {+/-}) 11... Nxd5 {+/=} 12. Nxd5 Qxd5 13. Qc2 a6 (13... a5 14. bxa5 Nxa5 15. Qxc7 {+/=}) 14. Nf4 {White threatens to win material: Nf4xd5} Qf7 15. h4 (15. f3 g5 16. Ne2 exf3 17. Bxf3 Ne7 {+/=}) 15... Be6 (15... h6 16. g4 {=}) 16. a3 (16. Nxe6 Qxe6 17. Rd1 Rfd8 {+/=}) 16... Rfd8 (16... Ba2 17. Ra1 Bb3 18. Qc3 {=}) 17. Bb2 {Black has an active position} (17. Nxe6 Qxe6 18. f3 exf3 19. Bxf3 Rab8 {+/=}) 17... Rd6 (17... Bb3 $5 18. Qc5 Rd6 {=}) 18. Nxe6 {+/=} Qxe6 {White has the pair of bishops} 19. Rfd1 (19. Rfc1 Rc8 {+/=}) 19... Qd5 (19... Ne7 20. b5 {+/=}) 20. Ba1 (20. Bf1 b5 {+/-}) 20... Rad8 (20... b5 {!? +/= is an interesting alternative}) 21. b5 {+/-} axb5 22. Bf1 b6 $4 {the position was bad, and this mistake simply hastens the end} (22... Qe6 { +/-}) 23. Rxb5 {+-} Qe6 (23... Qf7 {cannot undo what has already been done} 24. Bc4 Re6 25. Rc1 {+-}) 24. Bc4 Rd5 25. Rc1 (25. Bxd5 {nails it down} Rxd5 26. Rxd5 Qxd5 27. Rc1 {+-}) 25... Ne7 26. Bb2 (26. a4 $5 {might be the shorter path } f4 27. exf4 Bf6 {+-}) 26... Kh8 27. a4 Qd6 $2 (27... f4 28. Bxd5 Nxd5 29. exf4 e3 {+-}) 28. Bxd5 Nxd5 29. Qc4 (29. Rxd5 {keeps an even firmer grip} Qxd5 30. Qxc7 f4 31. exf4 Re8 32. Qxb6 e3 33. fxe3 Qf3 {+-}) 29... Rd7 (29... Bf6 30. a5 bxa5 31. Rxa5 {+-}) 30. a5 bxa5 31. Rxa5 Nxe3 (31... Rd8 {is the last straw} 32. Qb5 Qf8 {+-}) 32. Ra8+ (32. Ra8+ Rd8 33. Rxd8+ Qxd8 34. fxe3 {+-}) ( 32. fxe3 $6 {is easily refuted} Qxg3+ 33. Kf1 Qf3+ 34. Ke1 Qxe3+ 35. Qe2 Qg1+ 36. Kd2 Bh6+ 37. Kc2 Bxc1 38. Bxc1 Qg3 {+-}) 1-0

5 Nov 2015

C50 Hungarian Defence and Giuoco Pianissimo (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Be7 5.c3 d6)

C50 Hungarian Defence and Giuoco Pianissimo (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Be7 5.c3 d6)

This was played on round one of a tournament that was played at Turku almost 12 years ago. During the same year that this tournament was played I had only once dropped my rating and in all other occasions whether it was team matches or tournaments I had been able to increase it. That only drop was in a team match I had played in November. So it was time once again to get back on the right track. Good start for the tournament is always important and in this case, the draw was sufficient for that because my opponent was higher rated than me. Back in my earliest chess playing days I had very simple goals when playing over the board chess, I needed to win lower rated opponents and at least draw the higher rated ones. Maybe I have become too keen on winning games that anything except a win from my games is disappointing in some way to me. I think I should adapt that same mentality I had back then, it might help me to get my rating up a bit easier. I also think that I should add some daily tactics training to my schedule, then again I should have a more precise schedule in the first place... At the moment I just do things in their natural flow without any precise time restrictions for the things I do.


My statistics in this opening variation: 2 games with the black pieces, 1 draw (50%) and 1 loss (50%).

[Event "TuTS:n turnaus"] [Site "?"] [Date "2003.12.05"] [Round "1"] [White "Pitkäranta, Tapio"] [Black "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C50"] [WhiteElo "1695"] [BlackElo "1555"] [Annotator "Stockfish 8 64 POPCNT (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "152"] [EventDate "2003.12.05"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Be7 {Scotch Game: Benima Defense} (4... Bb4+ 5. c3 dxc3 6. bxc3 Ba5 7. e5 {Scotch Game: Cochrane Variation}) (4... Bc5 5. Ng5 (5. O-O d6 6. c3 Bg4 {Scotch Game: Scotch Gambit. Cochrane-Anderssen Variation}) 5... Nh6 6. Qh5 {Scotch Game: Vitzthum Attack}) 5. c3 d6 {C50: Hungarian Defence and Giuoco Pianissimo} 6. Nxd4 Ne5 7. Bb3 (7. Be2 Nf6 8. f3 a6 9. Be3 d5 10. O-O dxe4 11. fxe4 Nxe4 12. Bf4 Ng6 13. Qa4+ Bd7 14. Qb3 Nc5 15. Qc4 Nxf4 16. Rxf4 O-O 17. Rf1 Bd6 18. Nd2 Qg5 19. N2f3 Qg6 20. b4 b5 21. Qd5 c6 {Moudallal,T (2026)-Khalili,M (1693) Beirut 2016 1-0 (36)}) 7... Nf6 8. Bc2 O-O 9. O-O Bd7 $146 (9... Bg4 10. f3 (10. Qe1 c5 11. Nb3 a5 12. f4 Ng6 13. f5 Ne5 14. h3 Bh5 15. Bf4 Ra6 16. g4 Nfxg4 17. hxg4 Bxg4 18. Kg2 Bh4 19. Bg3 Qg5 20. a4 d5 21. exd5 Bxg3 22. Qxg3 Rh6 23. Rf4 Qh5 24. N1d2 Bh3+ {Divis,J (1875)-Kucera,V (2079) Czechia 2007 0-1 (43)}) 10... Bd7 11. Nd2 c5 12. Ne2 Qc7 13. f4 Neg4 14. Nf3 Nh6 15. h3 Kh8 16. c4 b5 17. b3 bxc4 18. bxc4 Rab8 19. Ng3 Nhg8 20. Qd3 Ne8 21. Bd2 f6 22. Bc3 g6 23. Rad1 Rd8 24. Rd2 {Von Hermann,B (2104)-Jahnke,A (2049) Germany 2010 1-0 (43)}) (9... c5 10. Ne2 $11) 10. h3 { Secures g4} (10. f4 Nc6 $14) 10... Qc8 (10... c5 11. Ne2 $11) 11. f4 $14 Nc6 12. Qf3 Kh8 13. Be3 Rg8 (13... Ng8 14. Nd2 $16) 14. Nd2 Rb8 (14... h6 15. Rae1 $16) 15. Nxc6 bxc6 (15... Bxc6 $142 16. Bxa7 Ra8 $18) 16. Bb3 {White threatens to win material: Bb3xf7} (16. e5 Rxb2 17. exf6 Rxc2 18. fxe7 c5 $18) 16... Be6 (16... a5 $5 $16) 17. Bxa7 Rb7 18. Be3 Bxb3 19. axb3 Qb8 (19... Rb8 20. b4 $16) 20. Ra4 (20. b4 $5 Rf8 $18) 20... Nd7 21. Rfa1 Nb6 22. Ra6 c5 23. R1a2 (23. e5 $142 $5 $18) 23... f6 24. Qf2 Qc8 25. Nc4 (25. f5 $5 $16) 25... Nxc4 $14 26. bxc4 {White has a new doubled pawn: c3} Qe6 27. Bxc5 Qxc4 (27... Qxe4 $5 28. Be3 Qxc4 $11) 28. Bd4 $16 c5 {Black threatens to win material: c5xd4} 29. R6a4 {White threatens to win material: Ra4xc4} Qe6 30. Be3 Rgb8 (30... f5 31. exf5 Qxf5 32. Ra7 $16) 31. Bc1 (31. f5 Qd7 $16) 31... Kg8 (31... f5 32. exf5 Qxf5 33. Ra8 $14) 32. Qf1 (32. f5 Qb3 $16) 32... Kf8 (32... f5 33. exf5 Qxf5 34. Ra8 $16) 33. Qc4 (33. f5 Qf7 $18) 33... Qd7 (33... Qxc4 $5 34. Rxc4 Rd7 $16) 34. Qd5 $18 Qc7 (34... Qb5 35. Ra8 $18) 35. Ra6 Rb6 36. Ra7 (36. Ra8 Rxa8 37. Rxa8+ Rb8 $18) 36... R6b7 37. Rxb7 Qxb7 38. Qxb7 Rxb7 39. Kf2 Ke8 40. Ke3 Kd7 41. f5 Kc6 (41... Bd8 42. Ra8 $18) 42. Ra8 Rd7 43. Rh8 h6 44. c4 Bd8 $2 (44... Rd8 45. Rxd8 Bxd8 46. Kf3 $18) 45. Kd3 (45. Bd2 $142 {makes it even easier for White} Bb6 46. Rg8 Rf7 $18) 45... Ba5 46. Rb8 Rb7 47. Rxb7 Kxb7 48. Bd2 (48. Ke3 Kc6 49. Kf3 Kd7 $18) 48... Bb6 $4 {Black falls apart} (48... Bxd2 49. Kxd2 h5 50. g3 $18) 49. b4 (49. Ke2 $142 {makes sure everything is clear} Kc8 50. Kf3 $18) 49... cxb4 $16 50. Bxb4 Kc6 51. g4 Ba7 52. Bd2 Bc5 53. Ba5 Kd7 54. Kc3 Kc6 55. Kb3 Kd7 56. Ka4 Kc6 57. Bd2 Kb6 58. Be1 Kc6 59. Ba5 Bd4 60. Kb3 Bc5 61. Be1 Kb6 $4 {the position was bad, and this mistake simply hastens the end} (61... Bd4 62. h4 $16) 62. h4 (62. Bb4 $142 {secures the point} Bd4 63. Bxd6 $18) 62... Kc6 63. Bd2 Bf2 64. h5 Bc5 65. Ba5 Kd7 66. Ka4 Kc6 67. Bc3 Kb6 68. Bb4 (68. Bd2 Bf2 $16) 68... Kc6 (68... Bxb4 $5 {might be a viable alternative} 69. Kxb4 Kc6 $11) 69. Kb3 (69. Be1 Bd4 $16) 69... Bd4 (69... Bxb4 $142 $5 {is worth consideration} 70. Kxb4 Kd7 $14) 70. Kc2 $16 Bb6 $4 {Black crumbles in face of a dire situation} (70... Be5 71. Kd3 $16) 71. Kd3 (71. e5 dxe5 72. Bf8 $18) 71... Ba7 $4 {the final mistake, not that it matters anymore} (71... Bd8 $142 $16) 72. Bc3 $18 Bc5 73. Bd4 (73. g5 hxg5 74. Bxf6 $18) 73... Bb4 $4 {another bit of territory lost} (73... Bxd4 74. Kxd4 Kc7 $14) 74. Ba7 (74. g5 fxg5 75. Bxg7 $18) 74... Ba3 $4 {gives the opponent new chances} (74... Bc5 75. Bxc5 Kxc5 76. Kc3 $11) 75. Kc3 $4 {letting the wind out of his own sails} (75. g5 Bc5 76. Bxc5 Kxc5 $16) 75... Bc1 (75... Bc5 $142 $5 {would keep Black alive} 76. Bxc5 Kxc5 $11) 76. Kb3 Bd2 1/2-1/2 [Event "TMCL 2016 Div C4 Round 5 Obsessive Chess"] [Site "Chess.com"] [Date "2016.05.15"] [Round "?"] [White "LangstonTillman"] [Black "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C50"] [WhiteElo "1692"] [BlackElo "1819"] [Annotator "Stockfish 8 64 POPCNT (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "47"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Be7 4. d4 exd4 5. c3 d6 {C50 Hungarian Defence and Giuoco Pianissimo} 6. Nxd4 Bd7 (6... Nf6 7. Bd3 O-O 8. O-O Ne5 9. f4 Nxd3 10. Qxd3 b6 11. e5 Ne8 12. Nc6 Qd7 13. Qf3 Ba6 14. Nxe7+ Qxe7 15. Qxa8 Bxf1 16. Kxf1 dxe5 17. Qf3 exf4 18. Bxf4 Nf6 19. Nd2 Re8 20. Bg5 Kh8 21. Bxf6 {Siembab, B (2210)-Gulik,M Dzierzoniow 2007 1-0}) (6... Ne5 7. Be2 Nf6 8. f3 a6 9. Be3 d5 10. O-O dxe4 11. fxe4 Nxe4 12. Bf4 Ng6 13. Qa4+ Bd7 14. Qb3 Nc5 15. Qc4 Nxf4 16. Rxf4 O-O 17. Rf1 Bd6 18. Nd2 Qg5 19. N2f3 Qg6 20. b4 b5 21. Qd5 {Moudallal, T (2026)-Khalili,M (1693) Beirut 2016 1-0 (36)}) 7. O-O Nf6 {Black threatens to win material: Nf6xe4} 8. Nd2 $146 (8. Qc2 O-O 9. f4 Qc8 10. Re1 Be6 11. Bd3 g6 12. f5 Bd7 13. Qf2 Ne5 14. Bc2 Qd8 15. Bg5 Nfg4 16. Bxe7 Qxe7 17. Qg3 h5 18. Nd2 h4 19. Qf4 g5 20. Qf1 f6 21. Bb3+ Kg7 22. h3 Nh6 {Skrlep,J (1606)-Sitar,Z (1533) Novo mesto 2003 1/2-1/2 (60)}) 8... O-O 9. h3 {Consolidates g4} Ne5 10. Bb3 Re8 11. Re1 Bf8 12. Nf1 h6 {Secures g5} 13. Ng3 b5 14. Ndf5 (14. f4 Nc4 $11 ) 14... a5 $11 15. a4 Qb8 (15... bxa4 16. Bxa4 Bxa4 17. Rxa4 $11) 16. Nh5 (16. f4 Nc4 17. Qd3 c6 $16) 16... Nxh5 $11 17. Qxh5 Be6 (17... bxa4 18. Bc2 $11) 18. Bxe6 Rxe6 $2 (18... fxe6 $142 $5 {should be examined more closely} 19. Nd4 bxa4 $11) 19. Nd4 $16 Rf6 (19... Re8 $5 20. axb5 Qb7 $16) 20. axb5 $18 Nd3 (20... Qe8 21. Qd1 $18) 21. Rf1 Qe8 22. Qe2 Nc5 23. f3 Qe5 $2 (23... d5 $142 24. exd5 Qxe2 25. Nxe2 Nb3 $18) 24. Rxa5 (24. Rxa5 Rxa5 25. Nc6 $18) 1-0

4 Nov 2015

A02 Bird's Opening (1.f4 e5 2.d3 Nc6)

A02 Bird's Opening (1.f4 e5 2.d3 Nc6)

The game below was played in round three of a third division, group 4 team match between HangSK and SalSK 3 almost 12 years ago. I am not sure what posessed me to play the opening I used in this game because I had not used anything like this before nor have I ever bothered with this since then. When I looked for other opening variations for the game notation below, I did find some that seemed interesting and I might try them if given the chance. I played on board 4 for SalSK 3 in this match that was played on five boards. I think we were clearly outrated on every board except for board 5 where we did manage to take our only win in the match. On the four other boards we lost, so the final result 4-1 for the home team was quite grim from our point of view.

Trying to teach chess to kids that are not interested in the game becomes more and more annoying as time goes by. It seems to me that kids today are more disrespectful to adults than they were back when I was a kid. I know this is too much of a generalization, because some children actually do behave well and respect the authority of adults. Of course respect is earned and should not be given too easily. Still it would make my job a lot easier if they would behave well and I would only need to concentrate on teaching chess and not on how to behave. Luckily the groups change from time to time, so that maybe the next group is a bit more easily handled than the current group.

[Event "Sarjapeli"] [Site "?"] [Date "2003.11.15"] [Round "?"] [White "Österlund, Magnus"] [Black "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A02"] [WhiteElo "1806"] [BlackElo "1564"] [Annotator "Stockfish 6 64 BMI2 (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "55"] [EventDate "2003.02.15"] 1. f4 e5 {Bird Opening: From's Gambit} 2. d3 (2. d4 exd4 3. Nf3 c5 4. c3 { Bird Opening: Siegener Gambit}) (2. fxe5 d6 3. exd6 Bxd6 (3... Nf6 {Bird Opening: From's Gambit, Langheld Gambit}) 4. Nf3 g5 {Bird Opening: From's Gambit, Lasker Variation}) 2... Nc6 {A02 Bird's Opening} 3. Nf3 exf4 4. Bxf4 Nf6 (4... d5 5. Nc3 (5. g3 Nf6 6. Bg2 Bd6 7. Bxd6 Qxd6 8. O-O Be6 9. c3 O-O-O 10. b4 h5 11. Na3 h4 12. Nb5 Qd7 13. Qe1 hxg3 14. h4 a6 15. Nbd4 Nxd4 16. cxd4 Qd6 17. e4 Qf4 18. Rc1 c6 19. b5 axb5 {Lesar,D (1588)-Livaic,L (2066) Sveti Martin 2014 1/2-1/2}) 5... Bb4 6. d4 Nf6 7. Qd3 Ne4 8. O-O-O Bxc3 9. bxc3 Qe7 10. Qe3 Na5 11. Nd2 Qa3+ 12. Kb1 Be6 13. Nb3 Nc4 14. Qc1 Nxc3+ {0-1 (14) Din,M (2085)-Ganguly,S (2573) Pune 2006}) 5. e4 d6 6. Be2 Be7 {N} (6... Bd7 7. O-O Qe7 8. Nc3 O-O-O 9. a3 h5 10. h4 Ng4 11. Nd5 Qe8 12. b4 Be6 13. c4 f5 14. b5 Nb8 15. Bg5 Rd7 16. Nd2 Bxd5 17. cxd5 Qe5 18. Nf3 Qg3 19. Qc1 Ne5 20. Nxe5 dxe5 21. Rxf5 {Priadun,R (2032) -Lashkov,A (1815) Abaza 2011 1-0 (54)}) (6... Bg4 7. O-O Qd7 8. e5 dxe5 9. Bxe5 Nxe5 10. Nxe5 Qd4+ 11. Kh1 Be6 12. Nc4 O-O-O 13. Nbd2 h5 14. Nf3 Qd7 15. Nce5 Qe8 16. Ng5 Bd6 17. Nxe6 Qxe6 18. Nc4 Kb8 19. Nxd6 Qxd6 20. Qe1 Rde8 21. Qf2 {Sindler,J-Graczyk,D (1839) Tarnowskie Gory 2007 0-1 (46)}) 7. O-O Bg4 8. Nc3 Qd7 (8... O-O 9. Qd2 {+/=}) 9. a3 {Covers b4} O-O-O 10. b4 h6 {Consolidates g5} 11. b5 {White threatens to win material: b5xc6} Nb8 (11... Bxf3 $5 12. Bxf3 Nd4 {+/=}) 12. a4 (12. Qe1 Be6 {+-}) 12... g5 (12... d5 13. e5 Nh7 14. Be3 {+/-}) 13. Be3 b6 $2 (13... d5 14. e5 Nh5 {+/-}) 14. a5 {+-} Rdg8 (14... d5 {what else?} 15. axb6 axb6 {+-}) 15. axb6 axb6 (15... cxb6 { doesn't get the cat off the tree} 16. Ra4 d5 17. Qa1 Bxf3 18. Bxf3 {+-} (18. gxf3 $6 Qh3 19. Rf2 g4 {+-})) 16. Ra8 Bxf3 17. Bxf3 g4 18. Qa1 Qe6 19. Be2 g3 ( 19... Kd7 {does not help much} 20. Qa7 g3 21. Bxb6 {+-}) 20. h3 h5 (20... Kd7 21. Qa7 d5 22. Rxf6 Bxf6 23. Nxd5 Be5 24. Nxb6+ Ke7 25. Nd5+ Qxd5 26. exd5 Rc8 {+-}) 21. Bxb6 $1 {Mate attack} Kd7 (21... cxb6 22. Qa6+ {Mate attack}) 22. Qa7 (22. Bxc7 $5 {and White can already relax} Rc8 23. Bxb8 Bd8 24. Qa7+ Bc7 {+-}) 22... Rc8 23. Rxb8 $1 {Deflection: c7} d5 (23... Rxb8 24. Qxc7+ {Mate attack Deflection}) 24. Rxc8 Rxc8 25. Bd4 Ke8 26. Bxf6 Bxf6 27. Nxd5 Be5 28. Bxh5 (28. Bxh5 Bd6 29. Bg4 Qg6 30. Bxc8 Kf8 31. Nxc7 Kg8 32. Nd5 Bf8 33. Rf4 Bd6 34. Rg4 Qxg4 35. Bxg4 Kg7 36. Bh5 Bc5+ 37. Qxc5 Kg8 38. Qe7 Kg7 39. Qxf7+ Kh8 40. Qf8+ Kh7 41. Nf6#) 1-0

3 Nov 2015

C54 Giuoco Piano: 4.c3 Nf6, main lines with 5.d4 and 5.d3 (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 a6 5.O-O Nf6 6.d3)

C54 Giuoco Piano: 4.c3 Nf6, main lines with 5.d4 and 5.d3 (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 a6 5.O-O Nf6 6.d3)

It took me some time, but I did manage to find yet another never before seen opening as far as this blog is concerned that is. Well, only for today as I did not have enough time to look further in my databases, so tomorrow is going to be another busy day, especially as I need to go and try to teach some chess again which will take some precious time away from looking through my databases. I have managed to find something to post everytime I have thought that this must be the end of new opening variations or chess960 starting positions.

This game was played in the second round of the tournament that was played in 2003 at Salo. I started plaing in over the board tournaments back in May 2001 and I think I got my first win in my thirteenth game, but I never had all that much success in these tournaments until something changed big time in the way I played the game. I had to reach a very low rating until things started to go the right way for me. I played in this same tournament a year before and then I lost all my games. After that tournament I just started to play a lot of games against the various characters in Chessmaster 8000 and I also started doing those exercises in it and it might have been the biggest reason why the next time I played OTB chess my climb through ratings seemed very easy. During the year that passed between this tournament and the one I played almost exactly a year ago before this one, I had increased my rating over 200 points. After this tournament my rating had increased 295 points from that lowest ever rating!! I do not remember a single occasion during that year that my rating would have dropped. Not only that but I had increased my rating 73 points in the tournament before this one and in this one I increased my rating 74 points. Clearly I had done something right after that disaster of a tournament. The game below was my first win in this tournament, but the first round draw also increased my rating because I faced an opponent that outrated me by almost 300 points.

[Event "SalSK"] [Site "?"] [Date "2003.11.01"] [Round "2"] [White "Niemi, Esa"] [Black "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C54"] [WhiteElo "1816"] [BlackElo "1490"] [Annotator "Stockfish 6 64 BMI2 (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "64"] [EventDate "2003.11.02"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 {Italian Game: Classical Variation (#2)} a6 (4... d6 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4 Bb6 {Italian Game: Classical Variation, La Bourdonnais Variation}) (4... f5 {Italian Game: Classical Variation, Alexandre Gambit}) (4... Nf6 5. b4 {Italian Game: Bird's Attack}) 5. O-O Nf6 6. d3 { C54 Giuoco Piano: 4.c3 Nf6, main lines with 5.d4 and 5.d3} b5 7. Bb3 O-O {N} ( 7... d6 8. h3 Bb7 9. Re1 Bb6 10. Nbd2 Qd7 11. Nf1 O-O-O 12. Be3 h6 13. Bxb6 cxb6 14. Ne3 g5 15. a4 Na5 16. axb5 axb5 17. Ba2 g4 18. hxg4 Nxg4 19. Nd5 Bxd5 20. Bxd5 Nf6 21. c4 Rhg8 22. Re3 {Peray,S (2010)-Deleau,D (2050) France 1999 1-0 (41)}) (7... Be7 8. Bd5 Bb7 9. Bxc6 dxc6 10. Nxe5 c5 11. Re1 c4 12. Nd2 cxd3 13. Qf3 c5 14. Nxd3 c4 15. Nf4 O-O 16. Nf1 Nxe4 17. Rxe4 f5 18. Ne6 Qd6 19. Rd4 Qxd4 20. Qxb7 {1-0 (20) Lopez Silva,H (2414)-Abarca Gonzalez,N (2267) Santiago de Chile 2014}) (7... d6 8. a4 Rb8 9. d4 {+/=}) 8. Bg5 (8. d4 $5 Ba7 9. Nxe5 Nxe5 10. dxe5 Nxe4 11. Bd5 Nxf2 12. Rxf2 {+/-}) 8... Be7 9. Re1 Bb7 10. d4 d6 11. a4 Qd7 (11... exd4 12. axb5 axb5 13. Rxa8 Bxa8 14. Nxd4 Nxd4 15. cxd4 {=}) 12. axb5 axb5 13. Rxa8 Rxa8 14. Nbd2 h6 {Black threatens to win material: h6xg5} 15. Bh4 Nh7 16. Bg3 Bf6 17. Bd5 Qc8 (17... exd4 18. cxd4 Na5 19. Bxb7 Nxb7 20. Qc2 {+/=}) 18. Qb3 exd4 19. Bxf7+ Kh8 20. cxd4 Nxd4 21. Nxd4 Bxd4 22. Nf3 Bb6 23. Qxb5 Nf6 (23... Ra5 24. Qe2 {+/-}) 24. e5 Ra5 25. Qb3 dxe5 26. Nxe5 ({Weaker is} 26. Rxe5 Ra1+ 27. Re1 Qa8 {=}) 26... Be4 (26... Qa8 27. Ng6+ Kh7 28. Nf4 {+/-}) 27. Ng6+ (27. Nc4 $5 Ra6 28. Nxb6 Rxb6 {+-}) 27... Kh7 {+/-} 28. Nh4 (28. Nf4 Qa8 29. Qd1 Bf5 {+/-}) 28... Qa8 (28... Qd7 29. h3 Rb5 30. Qa4 { +/-}) 29. h3 (29. Qd1 Bc5 {+/-}) 29... Ra1 {+/=} 30. Rxa1 Qxa1+ 31. Kh2 Bd4 ( 31... Qa7 {!? +/= is interesting}) 32. f3 $4 {stumbles just before the finish line} (32. Nf3 Bxb2 33. Nd2 {+/-}) 32... Qg1# 0-1

2 Nov 2015

C02 French: Advance Variation (1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Bb5 Qb6)

C02 French: Advance Variation (1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Bb5 Qb6)

It is time for some of my latest correspondence games and unfortunately that also means more losses are added to the blog... Well, unfortunate for me that is. Despite my best efforts, my rating in Online Chess at Chess.com keeps going down slowly but surely. After being in my relative best form in years there a few months ago, I can't seem to be able to win games in the same pace as before. I may need to start a lot more games in order to maintain my rating more easily at a level I like it to be. Before I start doing that in a major way, I would like to do other things with the time that is freed from those games. I only have 66 games in progress anymore and that seems to be roughly the amount that is quite easily maintained. I certainly do not have the same amount stress from the games I did have in the early part of this year when I had 300 games in progress. Even though I know I should never play that many games again at the same time if I like to keep my sanity, some part of me would like to go for even more games at the same time.

The game below was played in a tournament at Chess.com. The tournament is called Maximum ! and it is called that because the time you can use for every move is the longest you can have in games you can play at Chess.com, which is 14 days per move. Despite the fact that these thinking times were known by players at the start, there are still some people who complain about the length of the tournament. Sure this first round has lasted over a year, but what would you expect with these time limits, there are always some players who like to take their time with their moves and I do not personally have any problem with that because I accepted the long thinking times when I signed for the tournament... Even with the long thinking times, I have done some really bad moves in these games. The main reason for it obviously being that I don't actually have all that time due to the many, many other games I have had in progress at the same time. I am currently on eight place, but I can still finish third in group #4 if I win all my remaining three games. I am not sure I want to do that because that would mean that I would advance to the second round. Realistically I would be tied to this tournament at least for another year if that happens. I will always play for the win though and I would not lose on purpose just to avoid the possible long future commitment to the tournament. Tomorrow and the rest of the week seems to be at this point very uncertain what I will post. No new openings or chess960 starting positions have catched my eye so far, so what happens in the posts for the rest of the week is a mystery to me.

[Event "Maximum ! - Round 1"] [Site "Chess.com"] [Date "2014.09.11"] [Round "?"] [White "AndreasChess"] [Black "Vierjoki, Timo"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C02"] [WhiteElo "1922"] [BlackElo "1869"] [Annotator "Stockfish 6 64 BMI2 (30s), TV"] [PlyCount "93"] [EventDate "2014.??.??"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Nc6 {French Defense: Advance Variation} 5. Bb5 (5. Nf3 Bd7 {French Defense: Advance Variation, Euwe Variation} (5... Qb6 6. a3 (6. Bd3 {French Defense: Advance Variation, Milner-Barry Gambit}) 6... Nh6 { French Defense: Advance Variation, Lputian Variation})) 5... Qb6 {C02 French: Advance Variation} 6. Na3 Bd7 7. Nf3 Nge7 {N} (7... cxd4 8. cxd4 (8. Bxc6 bxc6 9. cxd4 Ne7 10. O-O h5 11. Nc2 Nf5 12. a3 c5 13. dxc5 Bxc5 14. b4 Be7 15. Ncd4 Nxd4 16. Nxd4 Rc8 17. Be3 Qb8 18. f4 g6 19. Rc1 Rxc1 20. Qxc1 O-O 21. Qd2 a5 22. Rb1 axb4 {Lopez Fernandez, A-Rojas,L (2423) Coria del Rio 2006 0-1 (34)}) 8... Bxa3 9. Bxc6 Bb4+ 10. Bd2 Bxd2+ 11. Nxd2 Bxc6 12. O-O Qxd4 13. Qe2 Ne7 14. Nf3 Qb6 15. a3 Bb5 {0-1 (15) Radjapaksa, C-Krause,T Neumuenster 1998}) (7... cxd4 8. Bxc6 (8. cxd4 $4 Bxa3 9. Bxc6 Bb4+ (9... Bxc6 $6 10. bxa3 Qa6 11. Bd2 { +/-}) (9... Qxc6 $6 10. bxa3 Qa6 11. Rb1 {+/-}) 10. Bd2 Bxc6 {-+}) 8... Qxc6 9. Nxd4 {=/+}) 8. O-O $1 {Loses material} (8. dxc5 Qc7 {+/=} (8... Qxc5 9. Be3 d4 10. cxd4 {+/-})) 8... Nf5 (8... cxd4 9. cxd4 Nf5 10. Bxc6 Bxc6 11. Nc2 {=}) 9. Be3 (9. dxc5 $5 {must definitely be considered} Bxc5 10. b4 {+/=}) 9... cxd4 { =/+} 10. Nxd4 {A sound move} (10. cxd4 $5 {deserves consideration} Be7 11. Be2 {=/+}) 10... Nxe3 {+/-} 11. fxe3 Nxe5 12. Qh5 Bd6 (12... Bxb5 $5 13. Naxb5 Bd6 {+/-}) 13. Bxd7+ {=/+} Kxd7 {Black loses the right to castle} 14. Nab5 (14. c4 g6 (14... dxc4 $2 15. Rxf7+ Kc8 16. Nxc4 Nxc4 17. Rc1 {+-}) 15. Qh3 f5 16. cxd5 exd5 {=/+}) 14... Raf8 (14... f5 15. Nxd6 Qxd6 16. b3 {+/-}) 15. a4 g6 { Prevents intrusion on f5} 16. Qe2 (16. Qd1 {=/+}) 16... Be7 (16... a6 17. a5 Qc5 18. Nxd6 Qxd6 19. e4 {+/-}) 17. b4 {White intends a5} (17. e4 f6 {=}) 17... a6 {Black threatens to win material: a6xb5} (17... f5 {!? +/-}) 18. a5 { = White threatens to win material: a5xb6} Qd8 19. Na3 (19. e4 f6 {=}) 19... Qc7 {= Black threatens to win material: Qc7xc3} 20. Rac1 (20. c4 $5 {should be examined more closely} Rc8 21. cxd5 exd5 22. b5 {=}) 20... Rc8 {+/-} 21. e4 dxe4 (21... Bg5 22. exd5 Bxc1 23. dxe6+ Ke7 24. Rxc1 {+/-}) 22. Rfd1 (22. Qxe4 $5 {might be a viable alternative} Ke8 23. Rce1 {=}) 22... Ke8 {+/-} 23. Qxe4 Nc6 (23... h5 {+/-}) 24. Nc4 {=} Rg8 $4 {there were better ways to keep up the pressure} (24... Rd8 25. Nxc6 Qxc6 26. Rxd8+ Bxd8 27. Qd4 {=}) 25. b5 (25. Nxe6 {secures the win} Qb8 26. Rd5 fxe6 27. Qxe6 {+-}) 25... Nxa5 (25... Nxd4 26. cxd4 Kf8 {=} (26... axb5 27. Nd6+ Bxd6 28. Rxc7 Rxc7 29. a6 {+/-})) 26. Nxa5 { +/-} Qxa5 27. Qxb7 Qc7 28. bxa6 (28. Qxa6 Bc5 29. Kh1 Kf8 {+/-}) 28... Bc5 $2 ( 28... Qxb7 29. axb7 Rb8 30. Rb1 {=}) 29. Kf1 (29. Rb1 f5 30. Kh1 Bxd4 31. Rxd4 Ke7 {+-}) 29... Kf8 $2 (29... Qf4+ {and Black can hope to survive} 30. Qf3 Qxf3+ 31. gxf3 Bxd4 32. Rxd4 Rc7 {+/=}) 30. Qxc7 Rxc7 31. Nb5 Re7 (31... Rc6 32. Rd8+ Kg7 33. Rxg8+ Kxg8 {+-}) 32. Ra1 (32. Rd8+ {would have given White the upper hand} Kg7 33. Rxg8+ Kxg8 34. Ra1 {+-}) 32... Kg7 {+/-} 33. Ra2 Ra8 34. Ke2 e5 (34... Rc8 35. a7 Bxa7 36. Nxa7 Rxc3 37. Nb5 {+/-}) 35. Rd5 Bb6 36. c4 f6 $4 {leading to a quick end} (36... Ba7 {+/-}) 37. c5 {+-} Bc7 38. a7 (38. c6 $5 {and White can already relax} Kf7 39. a7 Bb6 {+-}) 38... Kf7 39. Ra6 f5 40. g3 (40. Ke3 {might be the shorter path} Kf8 {+-}) 40... e4 (40... f4 { +- is the last straw}) 41. Ke3 Be5 42. Rb6 (42. c6 {keeps an even firmer grip} Bc7 43. Rd7 Rxd7 44. cxd7 Bd8 {+-}) 42... Bc7 43. Ra6 {Twofold repetition} Ke8 $4 {ignoring the path to victory} (43... Be5 44. c6 Bc7 {+-}) 44. c6 (44. Rf6 { +- makes it even easier for White}) 44... Rg7 (44... Kf7 {does not save the day } 45. Rd7 Rxd7 46. cxd7 {+-}) 45. Nd4 (45. Nxc7+ Rxc7 46. Rb5 Rxc6 47. Rb8+ Kd7 48. Rxc6 Rxa7 49. Rf6 Ke7 50. Rbf8 Ra3+ 51. Kf4 Ra6 52. Rxa6 Kxf8 53. h4 Ke8 54. Ra7 Kf8 55. Rxh7 Kg8 56. Re7 Kf8 57. Re5 Kg7 58. Kg5 Kf7 59. h5 gxh5 60. Kxf5 e3 61. Rxe3 h4 62. gxh4 Kg7 63. Re7+ Kf8 64. Kf6 Kg8 65. Re8+ Kh7 66. Rd8 Kh6 67. Rh8#) 45... Ke7 (45... Re7 {desperation} 46. Rb5 Kd8 {+-}) 46. Rd7+ Kf6 47. Rxg7 (47. Rxg7 Bxg3 48. Rxh7 Bd6 49. c7 Ke5 50. Rd7 f4+ 51. Kf2 e3+ 52. Kf3 e2 53. Raxd6 e1=N+ 54. Kg4 Ke4 55. Re6+ Kd3 56. Nf3+ Kc2 57. Rc6+ Kb1 58. c8=Q Nc2 59. Rb6+ Ka1 60. Qc3+ Ka2 61. Qb2#) 1-0